Guard Experience Gives Soldier Opportunity “To Be Part of Something Bigger Than Just Myself”

One of the main reasons SSG John Arnold joined the South Carolina Army National Guard was to get away from the 9-to-5 grind.

Mission accomplished.

His journey in the Army National Guard has taken him around the world and includes everything from working on multimillion-dollar boats in South Carolina to touring an ice cream factory in Afghanistan.

Though he’s had vastly different and wide-ranging experiences over his 10 years in the Army National Guard, one thing ties them all together: teamwork, discipline, the desire to succeed, and the willingness to learn something new.

Soldier Loves Guard’s Dual Mission

When SSG Arnold joined the Army National Guard, he was 26 and had an associate degree from a small technical college. He knew what he wanted: a sense of purpose. He also knew what he didn’t want: to work in a typical office environment.

He explored joining the military and passed up the other branches to join the Army National Guard.

“I loved the dual-mission aspect. We not only protect our own State and homeland, but we also travel abroad for peacetime and combat missions,” says SSG Arnold. “We’re the ‘jack-of-all-trades’ branch of the military and I absolutely love it.”

Different Military Occupation Specialties (MOS) Build Many Skills

His first MOS in the Army National Guard was 12B (Combat Engineer). To learn even more skills, he transitioned to several other MOSs, including 12R (Interior Electrician), and 12H (Senior Construction Supervisor).

“Another aspect I love about Guard life is I was able to change my MOS, which is tough to do in other branches of the military,” says SSG Arnold.

SSG John Arnold’s journey in the Army National Guard has taken him around the world and includes everything from working on multimillion-dollar boats in South Carolina to touring an ice cream factory in Afghanistan.
SSG John Arnold’s journey in the Army National Guard has taken him around the world and includes everything from working on multimillion-dollar boats in South Carolina to touring an ice cream factory in Afghanistan.

As he moved through different jobs in the Army National Guard, he took advantage of opportunities he encountered. The first was using the South Carolina Army National Guard’s Employer Assistance Team to get a job with a boat company. Another Soldier in his Unit was already employed there.

“I feel like my Guard experience played a major factor in getting hired,” says SSG Arnold. “It showed the company that I was disciplined, mechanically inclined with an electrical background, and that I was reliable.”

He was responsible for all the electrical components on each boat. Though he says it was “stressful and challenging” working on extremely expensive boats – “One screwup, I could fry an entire wiring harness and its components – he felt satisfaction when each job was finished.

Though he wasn’t able to accompany his Unit to Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria devastated the island (he had just received a promotion), he cheered them from afar. He was able to take advantage of deployments to Columbia, SC, to strengthen dams and remove debris from residential areas during torrential flooding; and Kandahar, Afghanistan, to build guard towers and cafeteria buildings, deconstruct forward operating bases, and ensure the safe transition from American forces to the Afghan National Army or local police.

Sharing Ice Cream and Experiences

It was in Kandahar, during what he calls his most fulfilling mission, that he encountered the ice cream factory.

“We did not get to taste the ice cream, however, the owner got to taste some American dip,” he says.

Though the ice cream factory was memorable, the impact he feels he made while there stands out more.

“We turned the land back over to the local tribal landowners who were, in turn, grateful and thankful for what the American forces had done in the area,” says SSG Arnold.

These are the types of experiences he gets to share every day in his newest role in recruitment. He also gets to speak with potential recruits about the benefits of service in the Army National Guard.

He tells them how he’s used his Army National Guard tuition benefits to pay back loans from his associate degree, to get a bachelor’s degree in emergency management, and start a master’s program in environmental policy and management. He tells them how the Guard gives him the opportunity to serve his community and his country. He tells them how the Guard is a great place to learn.

“The Army National Guard will teach you all of the skills you need during your AIT (Advanced Individual Training) school for your chosen MOS. To learn your MOS, all you have to have is the drive and desire to learn something new,” he says.

He also credits the Army National Guard with giving him self-assurance that will last his entire lifetime:

“Since joining, I’ve had the confidence to be able to take on anything life might throw at me, knowing I will take care of it.”

If you feel a calling to do more in life and give back to your community, check out the Army National Guard, where you’ll serve part-time and receive training in one of more than 130 careers in fields like Supply and LogisticsHeavy WeaponsGround Forces, and Administrative Careers. For details on any MOS, search our job board, and contact your local recruiter for more information.

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Sisters Inspire Each Other to Serve in the Military

The five Puro sisters of Utah took different paths to military careers. Left to right: Tiara, Air Force; Tambra, Army National Guard; Tayva, Air Guard; Ty’lene, Army National Guard; Taryn, Navy. (Photo by Steve Puro.)

SALT LAKE CITY, Utah – Tiara Puro was 17 when her father handed her a recruiting brochure for the Army National Guard. She remembers a feeling of excitement as she flipped through the pamphlet, especially when she read about the education benefits. She had been trying to figure out a way to pay for college, and the Utah Army National Guard was offering the equivalent of a full-ride scholarship for six years of service.

“When I enlisted, it was peacetime,” Tiara says. “There was nothing going on, and it was actually why I felt so comfortable agreeing to enlist. What’s six years of an enlistment during peacetime, especially if I get a college degree out of it?”

Tiara enlisted in 1999 as a 27D paralegal specialist. Once a month, she drove to the armory in Vernal to train until she finished high school. A week after graduating, she shipped to Basic Combat Training at Fort Jackson, S.C.

Tiara is the oldest of five sisters. Her four younger sisters are Tambra, Tayva, and twins, Taryn and Ty’lene. They all grew up in Roosevelt and graduated from Union High School. Their parents had met on the University of Utah ballroom dance team. All five sisters grew up singing and dancing. Four of the five sisters have placed in the Miss Duchesne County and Miss Uintah Basin pageants.

While large, musically inclined families are not uncommon in Utah, the Puro sisters are unique in that they are all currently serving in the military, with decorated careers spanning the Army, Air Force, and Navy.

“I don’t think any one of us thought that we would serve in the military,” says Tiara.

Tambra was 14 years old and a freshman in high school when Tiara left for basic. “It was a little scary, a little nerve-racking to think about her going off and doing all those things,” Tambra recalls. “But I just thought, ‘wow, that’s pretty awesome.’”

A few months later, Tiara returned home – the experience had changed her.

“I came home super excited about being in the military and what that meant,” she says.

As Tiara described the experience to her family, Tambra thought, “That will never happen in my life. It’s not something I’m interested in. Who wants to be yelled at by drill sergeants and do push-ups? I can’t even do a push-up, let alone pass a PT test. So, no thank you. I’ll do something else.”

Even at 12 years old, Tambra knew she wanted to do something important with her life.

“At the time, I was really interested in being a nurse, so I went and asked the hospital if I could volunteer.”

Tambra was the youngest volunteer the hospital had ever seen. She formed a group of young hospital volunteers called the Junior Pink Ladies. As a sophomore in high school, she started working on her Associate of Science degree in Pre-Health Sciences.

“Caring for others is a common thread in my life,” Tambra says. “That’s really what I’m passionate about.”

On the morning of Sept. 11, 2001, Tiara was at the University of Utah, when her father called her and said, “You need to turn on your TV.”

When she heard his unsettled tone, she went into the living room of her college apartment and switched on the TV. She watched the second plane collide with the South Tower of the World Trade Center.

“I knew in that moment my life would never be the same,” she recalls.

Tiara told her dad she loved him, but she needed to go. She hung up and immediately called her unit to find out what she could do to help.

The 2002 Winter Olympics came only a few short months after 9/11. Approximately 2,400 athletes from more than 80 countries, and even more spectators, were headed to Utah. Under the looming shadow of terrorism, the burden of law enforcement augmentation fell to the Utah Army National Guard. More than 4,500 Guard members were called up to provide security for the games, and Tiara was among them.

Tambra was a high school senior on the first anniversary of 9/11. She listened to a speech by President Bush as she was getting ready for school and thought to herself, “Where am I going in life? How will I pay for things? What’s my next step?”

“For members of our military,” President Bush said, “it’s been a year of sacrifice and service far from home.”

Tambra immediately reflected on her own sister’s sacrifice and service, and said to herself, “That’s what I want to do. Tiara did it, I think I can do it. I’m not very aggressive, I don’t do those physical things, but I can try.”

The same recruiter who worked with Tiara three years earlier happened to see Tambra at school that day and asked, “Have you given it any thought?”

Tambra replied “Yes,” and two weeks later, she enlisted in the Army National Guard to be an administrative specialist, assigned to the same unit as her sister.

“I really wanted to be a combat medic,” Tambra says, “But I also really wanted to start college as soon as possible. I chose the shorter occupational school.”

At the time, the Utah National Guard offered an orientation course called Non-Prior Service Support which helped prepare future Soldiers for Basic Combat Training. The course was conducted by a retired Marine drill instructor and designed to be physically grueling. Today, this same program has been expanded into the Recruit Sustainment Program.

“It just about killed me,” recalls Tambra. “I couldn’t sit up on my own for two full weeks.”

Realizing she had a lot of work to do, she started doing push-ups and sit-ups and went running every single day until she graduated high school. She was headed to Fort Jackson in March 2003.

Around that same time, Tiara’s unit received a mobilization order.

“In the Guard we’re always ready. We’re always exercising and training, so we were ready when the call came,” she says.

In April of 2003, Tiara’a unit headed to Iraq while Tambra was in the middle of basic training.

“The training felt very real to me because my sister was already in Iraq,” says Tambra.

Tambra would see newspapers in display cases outside the dining facility where she ate each day, headlining the toppled Saddam Hussein statue. As she donned her gas mask and entered the gas chambers, she imagined Hussein’s chemical attacks on innocent civilians and thought, “Wow. This is why we do what we do.”

When Tambra returned home from basic training, she immediately enrolled in Utah Valley State College using her new military education benefits, and joined the Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC). Even before enlistment, she had considered becoming an officer, but wanted the added experience of basic training.

Tambra graduated in the spring of 2005, with a degree in community health and military science. She was assigned to the 144th Area Support Medical Company as a medical services officer. As soon as she finished Officer Basic Course, she was headed to Fort Bliss, Texas, where her unit was preparing to deploy to Iraq.

Meanwhile, Tiara had returned from her own deployment and decided to reenlist, but this time in the Utah Air National Guard as a personnel specialist.

Then in 2010, the twins, Taryn and Ty’lene, graduated high school.

“I wanted to be a veterinarian,” says Ty’lene. “I kind of had it in my mind that I wanted to be an Army veterinarian, but I wanted to wait about a year after graduation to make sure the military was actually something that I wanted to do for myself, not just following in my sisters’ footsteps.”

She went to Weber State University with a music scholarship. One year after graduation, she met with the recruiter on campus and decided to enlist. The officer who administered the Oath of Enlistment was none other than Ty’lene’s older sister, Tambra, who had recently returned from her Iraq deployment.

Ty’lene joined under the Simultaneous Membership Program, planning to return to Weber State’s ROTC program after completing basic training, but plans changed when she had her first taste of the military.

“I fell in love with the Army mindset,” she says.

While still at Advanced Individual Training, Ty’lene applied for several full-time positions in the Utah National Guard. Two weeks later, she was working as an admin assistant in the Guard. Not long after that, she joined the Utah Guard Biathlon team and brought home two second-place medals from her first regional competition. She would go on to take first place in the 2015 Utah Best Warrior Competition, to become the Soldier of the Year.

Today, Tambra and Ty’lene serve in the Army National Guard, Tiara and Tayva serve in the Air Guard, and Taryn serves in the Navy.

“We’re intertwined,” Ty’lene says. “Even though we all have such different military careers, we’re all still connected.”

 “My parents raised us to know our strengths and to always try our hardest, to tell the truth and be brave,” says Tiara. “To do things that scare us. To eat the food that’s put in front of us, whether we like it or not. If you look at the way my mom and dad raised us, those skills are what helped us to adapt to serve in the military.”

When asked about what it’s like having five daughters serving in the military, Steve Puro says, “It’s the scariest thing you’ll ever be proud of. My girls have grown in the military. As a dad, I know they are going to be OK, because they have learned to stand on their own two feet and take charge of their lives.”

If you’re considering a military career, join the Army National Guard where you can serve part-time in your home State, and earn benefits like tuition assistance and affordable healthcare for you and your family. No matter your path, the Army National Guard has more than 130 positions in career fields including aviation, infantry, and maintenance. Explore open opportunities on the job board and contact a recruiter to jumpstart your military career today!

From an original article by SGT Nathaniel Free, Utah National Guard, which appeared in the news section of NationalGuard.mil in July 2019.

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A Guard Soldier’s Journey from Truck Driver to Attorney

In his eight years of part-time service with the Illinois Army National Guard, Jacob Smith has gotten some big benefits – leadership skills, a sense of direction in life, and his undergraduate and law degrees, courtesy of the Guard’s education benefits.

And now this former 88M Truck Driver is putting his law degree to work as the newest officer in the Illinois Guard’s Judge Advocate General (JAG) Corps, the branch of the Guard that serves as a legal resource for Soldiers, Guard units, and the State Adjutant General.

“It is an interesting contrast,” says First Lieutenant (1LT) Smith of his switch in military occupational specialties (MOSs) from driving large vehicles to now advising his colleagues on legal matters.

“Being a JAG officer is more applicable to my civilian career,” he says. “It will broaden my base of legal experience and knowledge.”

Growing up, 1LT Smith had positive impressions of becoming an attorney, having worked in his family’s law firm, and of military service because his father had served in the active duty Army and later the Illinois Army National Guard.

After starting college, 1LT Smith decided to serve in the military.

“I thought the Guard would be a good way to do both at the same time.”

1LT Jacob Smith has gone from 88M Truck Driver to an officer in the Illinois Army National Guard’s Judge Advocate General Corps.

1LT Jacob Smith has gone from 88M Truck Driver to an officer in the Illinois Army National Guard’s Judge Advocate General Corps.

He chose 88M because Illinois has a lot of transportation units, and the MOS had a relatively short training schedule. His Advanced Individual Training could be squeezed into a summer between semesters, plus he could drill close to school.

And because of his State’s tuition assistance, 1LT Smith estimates he has saved somewhere in the ballpark of $100,000 in tuition for his undergrad and law degrees. On top of that, the GI Bill helped with living expenses while he was in school.

“These are huge benefits on the financial side,” says 1LT Smith, 26, who’s also hoping to take advantage of another Guard benefit in the next few years – VA home loan eligibility – which allows Soldiers to buy a home with little to no down payment.

1LT Smith, who’s been an attorney since 2017, just recently completed his JAG Corps training, a two-part process. First, he attended the 6-week Direct Commission Course at Fort Benning, and then he spent 10 ½ weeks at the Judge Advocate General’s Legal Center and School in Virginia where he received “a crash course in many areas of military law.”

As a judge advocate in his new unit, 1LT Smith expects to do a fair amount of what’s called administrative law. This includes participating in administrative separation boards used to determine whether a Soldier should be discharged from the Guard because of misconduct. In such cases, the Soldier would appear before a board instead of in a courtroom.

“It’s one tool used by commanders to more efficiently deal with certain misconduct, rather than pursuing a court-martial process.”

Judge advocates often deal with cases involving criminal offenses as well, which is a departure from 1LT Smith’s full-time civilian law career, where he focuses on business law, estate planning, and commercial real estate and banking matters.

As a JAG officer, he’ll also be handling cases related to property law. 1LT Smith explains that typically a commander would initiate an investigation if a sensitive and valuable item like a pair of night vision goggles was lost to determine if someone should be held liable. A JAG officer would review the findings to make sure they are legally sufficient.

One of 1LT Smith’s goals for the future is to deploy overseas and work in operational law: “the laws of war, advising commanders in an overseas environment on whether they can legally engage certain targets, spend money on particular projects, and what are the repercussions for taking certain actions in a combat environment,” he says. “It’s an area of law where there’s not really a civilian equivalent.”

Overall, 1LT Smith says his time in the Guard has given him direction in his life, great people to serve with, and an opportunity to give back.

“The opportunity to serve comes with sacrifices, certainly, but I get to carry on a civilian career and work with incredible leaders and friends,” he says. “It adds tremendous value to my life.”

So, if you’re looking for a way to serve your community and your country part-time while you pursue a civilian career, you should speak to an Army National Guard recruiter. Besides outstanding education benefits, the Guard also offers training in more than 130 career fields.

Search our job board for details on careers in engineering, administration, infantry, armor and field artillery, aviation, medicine, military police, intelligence, mechanic and maintenance, transportation, and logistics support.

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