Australian Native Comes ‘Full Circle’ as D.C. Army Guard Vocalist

SGT Vicki Golding

SGT Vicki Golding, a vocalist with the District of Columbia Army National Guard’s 257th Army Band, sings the Australian national anthem as part of the Centenary of Mateship celebration during the Twilight Tattoo on June 27, 2018, at Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall, Va. SGT Golding, an Australian native who now lives in the U.S., also performed “The Star-Spangled Banner,” and “I Am Australian” at the event, which commemorated the 100-year anniversary of the partnership between the United States and Australia established during World War I. (Photo by Tech. Sgt. Erich B. Smith.)

ARLINGTON, Va. – For Sergeant (SGT) Vicki Golding, a vocalist with the District of Columbia Army National Guard’s 257th Army Band, performing during the recent Centenary of Mateship celebration event was, in a way, about coming full circle.

The celebration, held in Virginia, marked the 100-year alliance between the United States and Australia, and was a fitting opportunity for SGT Golding, a Brisbane, Australia, native who now lives in the U.S.

“In terms of representing both countries, this event felt like it was ready-made for me,” says SGT Golding, who was approached by Australian Embassy officials to perform at the event once they learned she was vocalist in the D.C. Army Guard.

“It wasn’t lost on me on what a big deal this was for a girl from Brisbane – ending up here in D.C. with the best military band in the country.”

Her journey from “Down Under” to singing in the 257th Army Band started in childhood where she was part of a family musical act with her three sisters and brother. Her father, whom SGT Golding described as the “essential music man,” led the group.

“My father was a music teacher and an opera singer and was a very technical musician. He was just the sort of person [who] would make you want to do better.”

While the music bug subsided for her siblings, SGT Golding’s love of performing continued.

Following the footsteps of a high school friend, she enlisted in the Australian army as a musician, eventually landing a position as a vocalist.

When the United States Army Band “Pershing’s Own” performed during an international tattoo (military entertainment performance) in Brisbane, SGT Golding says she was captivated by the variety of music they played.

“They had a rock band and a rhythm section along with the trombone section,” she says, adding she felt she was witnessing the “sheer talent of a premier band.”

Years later, marriage to an American brought her to the Washington, D.C., area.

Though she had left the Australian army, SGT Golding says she was still interested in serving and performing. That led her to reach out to Soldiers she knew from “Pershing’s Own,” who suggested the 257th Army Band as a good fit.

She followed the suggestion and enlisted in the Guard in 2003, even though the band didn’t have a singer vacancy at the time.

“When I first joined the 257th, I had videos and demos of me singing, and I said, ‘Look, I can play tuba, I can play percussion, but I really want to sing for you guys.’”

Eventually, a vocalist position opened up, and she wasted no time in securing her new role. Now, SGT Golding performs more than 35 shows a year, representing the D.C. Army Guard and the Army as a vocalist.

She says she thrives off the excitement of large-scale shows, especially in stadiums when she sings “The Star-Spangled Banner.”

“It’s a sacred piece that never gets old because there’s this energy that comes from the audience. You can feel the audience just waiting for you to sing it to them.”

But it was a military funeral for a D.C. Guard member lost in battle that she will never forget.

“I was singing the national anthem, maybe 10 feet away was his family, and I remember struggling.”

Years of performing in uniform, however, provided the focus needed to sing the song through.

“They had just lost their family member,” says SGT Golding. “If I can’t suck it up for 90 seconds, be professional, and do my job when they lost just about everything – that’s just not acceptable to me.”

SGT Golding brings that same kind of discipline and love of music to the civilian side, volunteering at non-profit organizations that cater to military spouses and veterans who use musical therapy to treat post-traumatic stress.

“I have been blessed with musical abilities, and any time I feel I am not using them, I feel like I am wasting something that was given to me,” she says. “And so I want to share what I have been given, whether it’s performing, teaching, or writing musical arrangements – whatever that might be.”

SGT Golding adds that her civilian experiences working with non-profit organizations, plus keeping abreast of popular music trends, help broaden her horizons as a military vocalist.

“It’s not a bad thing to think outside of the box,” she says. “Because if things aren’t flexible, they’ll break sometimes.”

While SGT Golding says the pinnacle of her musical ambition is performing on a network show back in her native country, she is thrilled with being a singing Soldier and sharing the same kind of camaraderie in the D.C. Army Guard as she felt in Australia.

“The common thread between the two militaries is the sense of family,” she says. “It was a real lifeline for me in Australia, and the same is true here in America.”

So if you’re looking for a way to use your talents and work on a team that becomes like a second family, consider joining the Army National Guard, where you can be an Army Bandperson like SGT Golding, or just about anything else you can imagine.

That’s because the Guard offers training in more than 150 careers, and you can research all of them on our job board by State, category, or keyword. Learn more about how you can serve part-time in the Guard and take advantage of its benefits like money for college by contacting your local recruiter.

From an original article by Tech. Sgt. Erich Smith, National Guard Bureau, which appeared in the news section of NationalGuard.mil in June.

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How I Got My College Degree for Free

The Army National Guard Paid for It

Between the Army National Guard’s Federal tuition assistance, State tuition assistance, and GI Bill, Sergeant First Class (SFC) Ryan West earned his bachelor’s degree for free.

He estimates that between the special military rates offered by the schools he attended and the Guard’s education benefits, he has saved $30,000 to $40,000 in tuition and fees.

Without the Guard picking up the tab, SFC West’s other options to pay for school were using his GI Bill from his previous active duty service in the Army or student loans.

SFC Ryan West, a Medical Readiness Non-Commissioned Officer with the South Carolina Army National Guard.

SFC Ryan West, a Medical Readiness Non-Commissioned Officer with the South Carolina Army National Guard.

“I was raised in a single-parent home, there just wasn’t money for college,” he explains.

SFC West, a Medical Readiness Non-Commissioned Officer with the South Carolina Army National Guard, has had a few stops and starts on his way to earning that degree. He had started college before joining the Army in 1998, but, “It didn’t work out for me. The money wasn’t there, plus I wasn’t that disciplined.”

So, he joined the military, something he had wanted to do since he was a child.

“I’m from a small town, Hopkins, South Carolina, so I wanted to get out and see the world, see new places, and meet new people,” says SFC West. “And, of course, defend my country. There’s nothing like it. You get a great reward from serving.”

After leaving active duty in 2002, SFC West wanted to continue his service, so he joined the Guard because he liked the idea of serving part-time, especially so he could go back to school.

But then he deployed to Iraq, which marked a complete turnaround in how he looked at his career.

“Prior to that, I was just a traditional Guardsman, just going through the motions, coming to drill. I didn’t really have aspirations of going higher in the ranks or being better than what I was.”

Experiencing what he did while deployed in Iraq as a 68W Healthcare Specialist (combat medic) – the inhumanity of war and even meeting new people from different places, made him realize he could reach higher.

It was after coming home that SFC West realized all of the Guard benefits he could use to complete his degree.

“You get funds from three different sources, which is great,” SFC West says. “You don’t get that in the Reserves, and you don’t get that in the regular Army.”

The Guard offers Federal tuition assistance. Plus, each State or Territory offers State tuition assistance, but note that each State or Territory has its own rules and policies. Finally, the GI Bill can pick up the tab for books, fees, or really anything. This money is a monthly expense allowance paid directly to the student, not the school.

 

SFC West and his family at his college graduation.

Armed with all of these financial resources and a renewed sense of purpose, SFC West re-started his studies at Limestone College in South Carolina, but then decided to take a full-time job with the Guard. As 2014 came into view, he decided to go back to school “to finish this thing before I retire,” finally earning his bachelor’s in organizational leadership from the University of South Carolina.

And, he might not be done using up all those education benefits. He still has some of his post-9/11 GI Bill benefits to transfer to his children, and he can still use the Guard’s tuition assistance to earn a master’s degree he’s thinking about getting.

His advice for anyone joining the Guard is: “Let the Guard get the most out of you, and you get the most out of the Guard.”

And that means taking advantage of all the opportunities it offers, including making the most of the education benefits.

“That paycheck means nothing if you stay five or six years and you don’t have a degree – a free degree,” he says.

So if you’re looking for a way to pay for college, or even vocational school, the Guard offers those benefits and more, like training in careers ranging from medicine and engineering to field artillery and logistics. You can explore all of the Guard’s career fields on our job board.

And, for personalized advice, including specifics on your State’s education benefits because the information varies from State to State, contact your local recruiter.

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The Ultimate Special Forces Soldier: Team Players with Brains and Brawn

All graduates of the Special Forces qualification course are military free-fall or HALO parachutists, while many others will receive follow-on training to become combat divers or proficient mountaineers, depending upon the type of team to which they are assigned.

All graduates of the Special Forces qualification course are military free-fall or HALO parachutists, while many others will receive follow-on training to become combat divers or proficient mountaineers, depending upon the type of team to which they are assigned.

If all you’ve ever wanted is to serve your country and join an elite team that carries out difficult and often dangerous missions by land, sea or air, the Army National Guard’s Special Forces could be for you.

But it’s definitely not for everyone.

You’ve got to be a top performer from a physical and mental standpoint, and you’re going to carry out missions that you cannot talk about. In fact, the Special Forces Soldier On Your Guard interviewed for this blog does not want to use his real name. We’ll call him Staff Sergeant (SSG) Jones, and with 6 years of experience as a Soldier, and 4 years as a Green Beret, he has more advice to share.

Having the right combination of smarts and physical endurance is “just enough to get you into the door. From there, you really have to have a burning desire to win and to achieve. But it’s tempered with the understanding that winning isn’t an individual event. It’s a team event.”     

The most important thing, he says, is the Soldier’s ability to work with others, especially in challenging environments.

“In order to function effectively as a team, you can’t be labeled as an individual. That just won’t work.”

SSG Jones took a roundabout route to joining his Special Forces Unit in Florida, enlisting at age 32 after selling a business he started. Having had no prior military experience, he enlisted as an 11B Infantryman under a contract called REP 63, which guaranteed him the right to try out for Special Forces. (You can read more about the process and requirements for non-prior military to join the Green Berets on our website).

Inspired to join the military in some capacity after the 9/11 terrorist attacks, SSG Jones, whose civilian career is in aerospace finance, researched other special operations branches in the military before landing on the U.S. Army Special Forces, and ultimately through the Guard.

“Rangers and Seals are primarily a direct action force,” he says. “So they’ll operate out of a base, go out and conduct a mission, such as a raid, and generally come back in a fairly short order.”

Special Forces, however, are trained to persist behind enemy lines. SSG Jones says his team will embed with indigenous forces and guerrillas in difficult environments to train them.

“We’ll work with the guerrillas and develop the battlefield ourselves, create our own mission sets and execute those missions,” he says. “There’s really no other Special Operations unit that can do quite what we do, spending months at a time embedded with these foreign organizations.”

To be able to communicate effectively, each Soldier is proficient in a foreign language. Part of the Special Forces qualification course is six months of intensive language training, where SSG Jones learned Arabic. Soldiers are also expected to maintain not only their language skills afterward, but their skills in general.

“We do a lot of follow-on training, so the training never really ends. The qualification course may end, but you’re really expected to build upon what you’ve learned.”

Even within the Green Berets there are different teams of 12, Operational Detachment Alpha, ODA’s or “A-teams” for short, and each Soldier within that ODA will have a specialty. SSG Jones, who serves on a dive team, is an 18C Special Forces Engineer Sergeant. These Soldiers excel at engineering tasks like demolition and construction in austere environments, while others specialize in intelligence, communications (from satellites to Morse code), medicine (trauma and general care), and weapons.

Check out this short video for a closer look at what Special Forces does.

Because part of the Guard’s mission is to serve the community, Special Forces can also be called up for stateside missions. The Green Berets are especially suited for the task because they are rapidly deployable, says SSG Jones. During a recent hurricane, some men on his team did search and rescue missions by boat.

And while SSG Jones can’t give specifics on his missions overseas, he can share, as an example of his team’s capabilities, that he completed a training mission that involved underwater infiltration of a military port where the team dove from a civilian fishing boat, set up demolition charges, and exited the area on a different fishing boat undetected in an area with heavy shipping lane traffic. Plus, the entire mission was conducted with a partner force in Arabic.

“It’s fun and it’s exciting,” he says, of his Special Forces work.

But it’s a serious job for dedicated Soldiers, so SSG Jones encourages anyone pursuing a green beret to “make sure you’re doing it for the right reasons. I think Hollywood and video games have made special operations, in general, seem really sexy.”

In reality, the road to becoming a Green Beret is rough.

“Probably 90 percent of that road is being cold, wet, and miserable or utterly exhausted and sleep deprived, and on the verge of a heat injury,” says SSG Jones. “So for the Soldier who thinks it’s all about jumping out of airplanes, diving, shooting bad guys, and talking yourself up at a bar … it’s probably not the right profession for you.”

What Special Forces really needs, he says are “strong, tough, intelligent Soldiers who are willing to put the mission before themselves.”

So if you’re interested in joining a team that puts the mission of serving the country and community above all else, there are plenty of ways to do that in the Guard, where you’ll serve part-time. The Guard offers more than 150 careers, from infantry and armor and field artillery to engineering and transportation. You can check out all of the possibilities on our job board and be sure to take a look at the Guard’s outstanding benefits like money for college.

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