Sisters Inspire Each Other to Serve in the Military

The five Puro sisters of Utah took different paths to military careers. Left to right: Tiara, Air Force; Tambra, Army National Guard; Tayva, Air Guard; Ty’lene, Army National Guard; Taryn, Navy. (Photo by Steve Puro.)

SALT LAKE CITY, Utah – Tiara Puro was 17 when her father handed her a recruiting brochure for the Army National Guard. She remembers a feeling of excitement as she flipped through the pamphlet, especially when she read about the education benefits. She had been trying to figure out a way to pay for college, and the Utah Army National Guard was offering the equivalent of a full-ride scholarship for six years of service.

“When I enlisted, it was peacetime,” Tiara says. “There was nothing going on, and it was actually why I felt so comfortable agreeing to enlist. What’s six years of an enlistment during peacetime, especially if I get a college degree out of it?”

Tiara enlisted in 1999 as a 27D paralegal specialist. Once a month, she drove to the armory in Vernal to train until she finished high school. A week after graduating, she shipped to Basic Combat Training at Fort Jackson, S.C.

Tiara is the oldest of five sisters. Her four younger sisters are Tambra, Tayva, and twins, Taryn and Ty’lene. They all grew up in Roosevelt and graduated from Union High School. Their parents had met on the University of Utah ballroom dance team. All five sisters grew up singing and dancing. Four of the five sisters have placed in the Miss Duchesne County and Miss Uintah Basin pageants.

While large, musically inclined families are not uncommon in Utah, the Puro sisters are unique in that they are all currently serving in the military, with decorated careers spanning the Army, Air Force, and Navy.

“I don’t think any one of us thought that we would serve in the military,” says Tiara.

Tambra was 14 years old and a freshman in high school when Tiara left for basic. “It was a little scary, a little nerve-racking to think about her going off and doing all those things,” Tambra recalls. “But I just thought, ‘wow, that’s pretty awesome.’”

A few months later, Tiara returned home – the experience had changed her.

“I came home super excited about being in the military and what that meant,” she says.

As Tiara described the experience to her family, Tambra thought, “That will never happen in my life. It’s not something I’m interested in. Who wants to be yelled at by drill sergeants and do push-ups? I can’t even do a push-up, let alone pass a PT test. So, no thank you. I’ll do something else.”

Even at 12 years old, Tambra knew she wanted to do something important with her life.

“At the time, I was really interested in being a nurse, so I went and asked the hospital if I could volunteer.”

Tambra was the youngest volunteer the hospital had ever seen. She formed a group of young hospital volunteers called the Junior Pink Ladies. As a sophomore in high school, she started working on her Associate of Science degree in Pre-Health Sciences.

“Caring for others is a common thread in my life,” Tambra says. “That’s really what I’m passionate about.”

On the morning of Sept. 11, 2001, Tiara was at the University of Utah, when her father called her and said, “You need to turn on your TV.”

When she heard his unsettled tone, she went into the living room of her college apartment and switched on the TV. She watched the second plane collide with the South Tower of the World Trade Center.

“I knew in that moment my life would never be the same,” she recalls.

Tiara told her dad she loved him, but she needed to go. She hung up and immediately called her unit to find out what she could do to help.

The 2002 Winter Olympics came only a few short months after 9/11. Approximately 2,400 athletes from more than 80 countries, and even more spectators, were headed to Utah. Under the looming shadow of terrorism, the burden of law enforcement augmentation fell to the Utah Army National Guard. More than 4,500 Guard members were called up to provide security for the games, and Tiara was among them.

Tambra was a high school senior on the first anniversary of 9/11. She listened to a speech by President Bush as she was getting ready for school and thought to herself, “Where am I going in life? How will I pay for things? What’s my next step?”

“For members of our military,” President Bush said, “it’s been a year of sacrifice and service far from home.”

Tambra immediately reflected on her own sister’s sacrifice and service, and said to herself, “That’s what I want to do. Tiara did it, I think I can do it. I’m not very aggressive, I don’t do those physical things, but I can try.”

The same recruiter who worked with Tiara three years earlier happened to see Tambra at school that day and asked, “Have you given it any thought?”

Tambra replied “Yes,” and two weeks later, she enlisted in the Army National Guard to be an administrative specialist, assigned to the same unit as her sister.

“I really wanted to be a combat medic,” Tambra says, “But I also really wanted to start college as soon as possible. I chose the shorter occupational school.”

At the time, the Utah National Guard offered an orientation course called Non-Prior Service Support which helped prepare future Soldiers for Basic Combat Training. The course was conducted by a retired Marine drill instructor and designed to be physically grueling. Today, this same program has been expanded into the Recruit Sustainment Program.

“It just about killed me,” recalls Tambra. “I couldn’t sit up on my own for two full weeks.”

Realizing she had a lot of work to do, she started doing push-ups and sit-ups and went running every single day until she graduated high school. She was headed to Fort Jackson in March 2003.

Around that same time, Tiara’s unit received a mobilization order.

“In the Guard we’re always ready. We’re always exercising and training, so we were ready when the call came,” she says.

In April of 2003, Tiara’a unit headed to Iraq while Tambra was in the middle of basic training.

“The training felt very real to me because my sister was already in Iraq,” says Tambra.

Tambra would see newspapers in display cases outside the dining facility where she ate each day, headlining the toppled Saddam Hussein statue. As she donned her gas mask and entered the gas chambers, she imagined Hussein’s chemical attacks on innocent civilians and thought, “Wow. This is why we do what we do.”

When Tambra returned home from basic training, she immediately enrolled in Utah Valley State College using her new military education benefits, and joined the Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC). Even before enlistment, she had considered becoming an officer, but wanted the added experience of basic training.

Tambra graduated in the spring of 2005, with a degree in community health and military science. She was assigned to the 144th Area Support Medical Company as a medical services officer. As soon as she finished Officer Basic Course, she was headed to Fort Bliss, Texas, where her unit was preparing to deploy to Iraq.

Meanwhile, Tiara had returned from her own deployment and decided to reenlist, but this time in the Utah Air National Guard as a personnel specialist.

Then in 2010, the twins, Taryn and Ty’lene, graduated high school.

“I wanted to be a veterinarian,” says Ty’lene. “I kind of had it in my mind that I wanted to be an Army veterinarian, but I wanted to wait about a year after graduation to make sure the military was actually something that I wanted to do for myself, not just following in my sisters’ footsteps.”

She went to Weber State University with a music scholarship. One year after graduation, she met with the recruiter on campus and decided to enlist. The officer who administered the Oath of Enlistment was none other than Ty’lene’s older sister, Tambra, who had recently returned from her Iraq deployment.

Ty’lene joined under the Simultaneous Membership Program, planning to return to Weber State’s ROTC program after completing basic training, but plans changed when she had her first taste of the military.

“I fell in love with the Army mindset,” she says.

While still at Advanced Individual Training, Ty’lene applied for several full-time positions in the Utah National Guard. Two weeks later, she was working as an admin assistant in the Guard. Not long after that, she joined the Utah Guard Biathlon team and brought home two second-place medals from her first regional competition. She would go on to take first place in the 2015 Utah Best Warrior Competition, to become the Soldier of the Year.

Today, Tambra and Ty’lene serve in the Army National Guard, Tiara and Tayva serve in the Air Guard, and Taryn serves in the Navy.

“We’re intertwined,” Ty’lene says. “Even though we all have such different military careers, we’re all still connected.”

 “My parents raised us to know our strengths and to always try our hardest, to tell the truth and be brave,” says Tiara. “To do things that scare us. To eat the food that’s put in front of us, whether we like it or not. If you look at the way my mom and dad raised us, those skills are what helped us to adapt to serve in the military.”

When asked about what it’s like having five daughters serving in the military, Steve Puro says, “It’s the scariest thing you’ll ever be proud of. My girls have grown in the military. As a dad, I know they are going to be OK, because they have learned to stand on their own two feet and take charge of their lives.”

If you’re considering a military career, join the Army National Guard where you can serve part-time in your home State, and earn benefits like tuition assistance and affordable healthcare for you and your family. No matter your path, the Army National Guard has more than 130 positions in career fields including aviation, infantry, and maintenance. Explore open opportunities on the job board and contact a recruiter to jumpstart your military career today!

From an original article by SGT Nathaniel Free, Utah National Guard, which appeared in the news section of NationalGuard.mil in July 2019.

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GI Jon: Guard Soldier’s Journey to Living His Dreams

Ever since he was a child, SPC Jonathan Mullins wanted to be a GI Joe.

“I always wanted to be just like the Soldiers in the movies.”

But sometimes life takes unexpected turns. At 19, SPC Mullins was sitting in a Marine Corps recruitment office, waiting to sign his enlistment papers when he got a call that his wife was expecting their first child.

He put his dream on the back-burner and jumped into his new role as a father, taking care of his wife and first-born daughter.

SPC Jonathan Mullins is an 11B Infantryman in the Virginia Army National Guard.

It wasn’t until the day that SPC Mullins’ fates aligned that he knew where he belonged. He was working in construction and didn’t have health benefits when he fell off a roof at work. Luckily, he wasn’t hurt badly.

The same day, he blew a tire and found himself sitting in the parking lot of a Virginia Army National Guard Recruiting and Retention office. Ironically, his wife’s cousin was once a colonel in that office. He took this as a sign that it was time to pursue his dream.  He immediately called the colonel and asked her what he needed to do to enlist.

At that point, SPC Mullins was a 30-year-old homeowner and father of three. Joining the Army National Guard rather than an active duty branch of the armed services would allow him to serve in the military without having to move his family away from home.

“I didn’t want to uproot them because we had everything right here; I didn’t want to take them away from that,” he says.

“The best part about being in the Guard is that you still get to come home.”

Now 32, he’s been able to live out his dream as an 11B Infantryman – but that’s not all he wanted to be. After enlisting, he started applying to law enforcement agencies in the area, landing the other job he’d always wanted:  police officer. For SPC Mullins, having the flexibility to serve part-time and have a civilian career at the same time has been one of the most rewarding benefits of joining the Guard.

There are other perks, too. He’s now able to provide health insurance for him and his family. He’s also using the Guard’s education benefits to work toward a degree in ministry, which will help him when he plans on reclassing as a 56M Chaplain Assistant in the future.

“I’ve worked through the ministry for quite some time, since I was 21,” he says, “and I really feel like that’s where I’m being led.”

SPC Mullins with his wife and three children.

For SPC Mullins, it’s all about making his family proud and being able to do the things he loves. His Guard experience has fulfilled him in ways he never thought possible. He dropped out of high school at a young age, went back to get his GED, and thought he would join the workforce, following wherever the dollar led him.

Now he has a new outlook: “Work hard and don’t give up.”

He reminisces about the strongest piece of advice he’d received from a drill sergeant when things seemed tough in the beginning of his Guard journey:

“If you feel like giving up, you’re only giving 40 percent. You’ve still got 60 percent left to give, so you’ve got to dig deep and give that 60 percent.”

SPC Mullins passes that advice on to others with the hopes of inspiring them to live their truths and pursue their passions.

“If it’s your dream, and it’s something you’ve always wanted to do, pursue it and live that dream.”

If you’re looking for a fulfilling career with benefits like tuition assistance, insurance for you and your family, and the ability to serve part-time in your home State, check out the National Guard job board. With more than 130 careers in fields like aviation, engineering, and transportation, there’s something for everyone in all walks of life. Contact a recruiter today to learn more about how you can join the Army National Guard.

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Like Father, Like Sons: Idaho Guard’s Bundy Brothers Serve Together

FORT IRWIN, Calif. – Idaho Army National Guard Soldiers Second Lieutenant (2LT) Zane Bundy and his big brother, Sergeant (SGT) Nathan Bundy, take after their father, Matt Bundy, in a number of ways.

All three work for the Mountain Home School District. Matt and Nathan both teach at Mountain Home High School, and Zane is a substitute teacher who hopes to have his own classroom someday. In addition, all three either have or are currently serving in the military.

Matt retired from the U.S. Air Force. Nathan and Zane both serve in the Army National Guard’s 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team’s 2nd Battalion, 116th Cavalry Regiment, headquartered in Caldwell. For the next couple of weeks, both are attending a training at Fort Irwin, Calif.

“I was raised on the idea of serving my country,” says Nathan, who enlisted into the Idaho Army National Guard in 2012 as a 35F Intelligence Analyst.

Nathan is the intelligence section’s senior noncommissioned officer. His team’s job is to help analyze intel Soldiers in the combined arms battalion collect and to help his battalion commander make good decisions on the battlefield.

Idaho Army National Guard 2LT Zane Bundy and SGT Nathan Bundy pose for a selfie while training together at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, Calif.

Idaho Army National Guard 2LT Zane Bundy and SGT Nathan Bundy pose for a selfie while training together at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, Calif.

It’s a position that’s vastly different than Zane’s job, who leads a platoon in Idaho’s only infantry company from his Bradley Fighting Vehicle.

“Serving together gives us a new dynamic in our relationship,” Nathan says. “It’s a new common ground and a shared experience, but we’re also on different sides of the Guard as an enlisted intel Soldier and an infantry officer.”

Zane joined the Idaho Army National Guard in January 2017, and earned his commission in November 2017.

“I saw how great of an opportunity Nate had to be in the Guard, so I thought I would follow,” says Zane.

At his commissioning ceremony, Nathan was the first to salute his younger brother of four years.

“I was really proud of him when he commissioned,” Nathan recalls.

Zane says he doesn’t get to see much of his brother during unit operations, but that it’s always good to see him when their paths cross. Both agree that serving in the Army National Guard provides them with experiences they don’t get to have in the classroom as teachers.

“I enjoy both jobs,” Nathan boasts. “Being able to serve part-time is a great experience.”

The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team is completing a month-long rotation at the National Training Center to build unit readiness and increase Solider proficiency in its wartime missions. The unit will train against a near-peer opposing force provided by the Army’s 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment. More than 4,000 Guard Soldiers from more than 30 States are participating in the exercise.

The Army National Guard gives you the opportunity to pursue a civilian career while serving part-time in your home State, so your family is always close by! With positions in more than 130 career fields including armor and field artillery, intelligence, and aviation, you can find your perfect fit. Check out the job board for more information on available careers, and contact a local recruiter to learn more.

From an original article by CPT Robert Taylor, Idaho National Guard, which appeared in the news section of NationalGuard.mil in June 2019.

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