North Carolina National Guard Sibling Soldiers Reunite on Deployment

U.S. Army Specialist Jacqueline Herzog stands next to her brother, Private First Class, Jeremiah Herzog.
U.S. Army Specialist Jacqueline Herzog stands next to her brother, Private First Class, Jeremiah Herzog, in the Middle East while supporting Operation Spartan Shield, April 9, 2020.

UNDISCLOSED LOCATION – April 10th is Siblings Day, recognizing the special bond between brothers and sisters. The military, including the Army National Guard, is often recognized for similar bonds, because of the special trust that develops among service members in the ranks.

In the 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, two Soldiers, who are also brother and sister, were recently brought back together in the Middle East supporting Operation Spartan Shield. In March, U.S. Army Private First Class (PFC) Jeremiah Herzog and U.S. Army Specialist (SPC) Jacqueline Herzog were reunited after eight months of separation, just in time for Siblings Day.

“I was pretty happy to see my sister again,” says Jeremiah Herzog, an Armored Crewman in the 1-252nd Armored Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team. “I hadn’t seen her since the Fourth of July last year. It was really exciting to see her here in the desert.”

The Herzogs joined the North Carolina National Guard together in the spring of 2018. PFC Herzog, who is two years older, says he was inspired to join after his sister enlisted as a Combat Engineer during her junior year of high school.

“I was surprised when she joined. I didn’t think she was really going to do it, so I had to one-up her and join too,” he says.

SPC Herzog, a Combat Engineer in the 236th Brigade Engineer Battalion, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, says basic training was a proud moment, and she is grateful for the support of her parents.

“My mom was hesitant about me joining, but my dad thought it was great. He said, ‘You’re going to get to blow stuff up,’” says SPC Herzog. “He thought it was cool.”

When she went on to complete Advanced Individual Training at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri, her brother left for Operation Spartan Shield in the summer of 2019.

“I was happy she made it through. I was both nervous and proud of her,” says PFC Herzog.

The Herzog siblings are nicknamed “other Herzog” by their peers. PFC Herzog says the nickname started their first drill weekend together when they got teased for having the same last name.

“It was a rough first drill weekend together and our first physical training experience,” says PFC Herzog. “It was confusing for people to call us the same name.”

SPC Herzog says going through these experiences together was comforting because they supported each other. She added that it felt like they had each other to count on and that made it better.

PFC Herzog says he’s made a lot of friends while deployed, and it has been a good opportunity for him to perform his job and earn money.

“I love working on the tank and have the most fun when I’m doing tank maintenance,” says PFC Herzog.

SPC Herzog says she enjoys demolition and was excited for upcoming water impulse charge demolition training.

“We blow a big hole in the door in order to breach it so we can move in or get past it,” says SPC Herzog.

The Herzog siblings say they go to dinner every night together and enjoy spending time to sit and talk. They say they are thankful for the continued support of their family and want them to know they love them very much.

When not on deployment, the Army National Guard gives you the opportunity to pursue a civilian career while serving part-time in your home State, so your family is always close by! With positions in more than 130 career fields including armor and field artillery, ground forces and engineering, you can find your perfect fit. Check out the job board for more information on available careers, and contact a local recruiter to learn more.  

From an original article by CPT Regina Corbin, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, which appeared in the news section of NationalGuard.mil in April 2020.

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Guard Recruiter Knows Price of Freedom

As a boy, Othello Smith fled Liberia with his father and some family members – on foot – to escape civil war in 1996. They took refuge in Sierra Leone, only to have civil war break out there, too, forcing the family to flee yet again – this time to Guinea.

Fortunately, Smith and his family were granted asylum as war refugees in the U.S. and settled in Rhode Island in 1998. He still hasn’t seen his mother, who’s in Liberia, since 1994. They’re hoping to connect with each other via Facebook when the technology becomes available to her.

Smith has seen what it’s like to live in a country with too much freedom – as in freedom to do anything you want without repercussions. In his experience in Liberia, “freedom is handing a gun to a 14-year-old kid, and he can do whatever he wants with that weapon. A young kid could see his uncle die in front of him because that is the freedom that is afforded in that county. There was nothing there to prevent that civil war.”

Smith is grateful that his new homeland has protections in place to prevent the kind of chaos he’s lived through, but still, freedom comes with a price that some Americans take for granted.

SPC Smith
SPC Othello Smith, Rhode Island Army National Guard recruiter.

That’s one of the reasons he joined the Rhode Island Army National Guard three years ago at age 28. The Guard also offered Specialist (SPC) Smith an expedited path to citizenship and education benefits to help him earn a degree in nursing and perhaps, later, pharmacy. As a first-generation American, he wants to set a good example for his two children that anything can be accomplished through hard work.

SPC Smith thought about going Active Duty but, “the National Guard just seemed to be the best fit, as far as accomplishing your goals, and still staying in the State, serving your country, and making a difference at the same time.”

His decision to join the military was met with some resistance from his father.

“Because of so many traumatizing things that we witnessed – I literally lived through two civil wars – my father, at the time, was totally against any military activity. I decided if I were ever to bear arms and get deployed, I will change the way soldiers behave toward citizens.”

Of all Military Occupational Specialties (MOSs), SPC Smith chose one of the loudest – 13B Cannon Crewmember – a choice that could have easily triggered bad memories from his youth. During one of his first Fourths of July in Rhode Island, he remembers that fireworks sent him under his bed, where his family found him screaming and crying.

SPC Smith says he got used to loud noises on his own and through his faith in God.

He was determined to be trained in “one of the hardest MOSs the military has to offer. I like to get my hands dirty and roll up my sleeves,” he says.

Over the last year, he has transitioned to recruiting for the Rhode Island Guard. One of his goals is to expose fellow Liberian immigrants – his State has one of the largest Liberian populations in the U.S. – to military life.

“There’s more to being in America than just being an employee. You have to be a difference-maker.”

To SPC Smith, “what the Guard stands for is making a change in people’s lives.” He has found both mentors and a family in the Guard.

“The military has wrapped its arms around me and showed me that there are people out there who are willing to help you in your career, help you with a family situation, and give you advice.”

When some of his recruits come in unsure of their physical capabilities, SPC Smith tells them, “an old guy like me went to basic training and did it, and you will be able to do it. You’re not there by yourself. They are people with you every step of the way.”

SPC Smith says he often gets a text or an email from his recruits thanking him for his support.

“The relationship that I build with my recruits is very important to me,” he says. “Changing lives, that’s the most important mission I’ve accomplished so far in the military.”

If you’re up for a life-changing experience, you’ll find it in the Army National Guard, where you’ll serve part-time and receive training in one of more than 130 careers in fields like Supply and Logistics, Technology and Networking, Ground Forces, and Engineering. For details on any MOS, search our job board, and contact your local recruiter for more information.

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