Guard Soldier Finds Best of Both Worlds in Music and the Military

As a kid, Sergeant (SGT) Nicholas Rossetti loved music. He always listened to it with his family, and once his sister picked up an instrument, he knew he wanted to play one too.

In third grade, he received his first drum set and learned to play by listening to music, drumming along whether it sounded good or not, and taking lessons. By the end of elementary school, he had a good grasp of the fundamentals and continued playing in bands throughout middle and high school as a percussionist.

SGT Rossetti plays drums at a concert with the 39th Army Band of New Hampshire.

Not only was he passionate about music, but he had always wanted to be in the military. In high school he wanted to do Junior ROTC, but his music career took center stage. It wasn’t until one day during his junior year that the two worlds collided, when an active duty Navy rock band played a concert at his school.

“I was blown away,” he recalls.

This was the moment he realized that he could combine his love of music with his love of the military, but as he reached his senior year, he started thinking about college and careers. He didn’t believe it was possible to make a living off of being a musician, and after graduating, life took him in a different direction.

His band director said to him, “You’re making a mistake, you’re really going to miss playing music.”

SGT Rossetti ignored the advice, and after a year of business school, he realized he missed being in a band.

One day as he was walking to class, he saw an Army National Guard recruiter tent on campus, with a sign that read: “Play Music in the Military with the National Guard!”

Once he learned that he could be in a band again, serve part-time in the military, continue his education, and stay home with his family, he enlisted.

“It was just the best of every single aspect I wanted,” he recalls.

As he became acclimated to his new lifestyle, he fell in love with Army culture.

“I joined to play music, and now I love more about the Army than just music,” he boasts. “It’s opened up a whole new slew of opportunities, experiences, and passions that I love.”

In 2018, SGT Rossetti competed in the Best Warrior Competition and won at the State level. He attended regionals in New York, and while he didn’t take the title, he got the opportunity to attend Air Assault school, a physically demanding 10-day training course with a reputation for being one of the tougher military programs to complete.

SGT Rossetti poses for the camera during a ruck march in the 2018 State-level Best Warrior competition.

He felt like the underdog of his class, training alongside a handful of rough and tough infantrymen, with one goal in mind – to prove that a bandsman was just as capable as any other Soldier.

“That’s all I’ve wanted to do since getting here, is just crush that typical band reputation. We’re just as capable, just as strong, and just as smart as everyone else.”

To his surprise, he received his wings as an honor grad at the top of his class.

Back home, SGT Rossetti gets to live out his dream as a 42R Army Bandperson in the 39th Army Band of New Hampshire. Throughout the year, the band tours the State and plays a variety of events including holiday concerts, a summer concert series, and school concerts, to name a few. This past 4th of July, the 39th played a concert for the public in Dover, N.H., before a ceremonial fireworks display.

SGT Nicholas Rossetti is a percussionist in the 39th Army Band of New Hampshire.

For the rest of the summer, the band will continue playing shows at parks, town halls, and other local venues.

SGT Rossetti’s been given endless experiences and opportunities in the Guard and wouldn’t trade them for anything. He’s traveled abroad to the Bahamas and El Salvador, he’s made lifelong friends, and he gets to make an impact on others. He has an immense amount of pride in what he does.

“There’s nothing more fulfilling than putting that uniform on, being in the National Guard, and knowing you have a whole entire family of Guardsmen by your side.”

Camaraderie was always something SGT Rossetti cherished when he played music as a teenager, but once he joined the New Hampshire Army National Guard, he found an everlasting family of Soldiers who would do anything for each other.

“It’s really just the best of both worlds. If you enjoy camaraderie of bands, playing with incredible musicians, playing gigs – it’s a no brainer joining the Army National Guard.”

If you’re looking for a way to pursue your passions, explore all that the Army National Guard has to offer. Whether you’re into aviation, engineering, or cyber, to name a few, there’s something for everyone. Not only will you be able to live out your dreams, but you’ll get access to benefits like tuition assistance, insurance benefits, and more. Browse current openings on the job board today, and contact a recruiter for more information on how you can serve.

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Gaining Strength Through the Power of Music

INDIANAPOLIS – A quiet 17-year-old from the band halls of R. Nelson Snider High School discovered a lot about herself when she decided to join the military to pursue her love of music.

“I was a passive and quiet band geek that lived and breathed band hall,” says Staff Sergeant (SSG) LeeAnn Boaz. “First period was band and orchestra, second period was choir, third period was music theory, and fourth period would be either math or English.”

During her senior year in high school, SSG Boaz began taking college courses to continue her education in music. Later, she received her bachelor’s degree in psychology, as it was the closest field to music therapy that Indiana University-Purdue University offered.

SSG Boaz recalled taking a personality test at the university called the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator test. It was no surprise to SSG Boaz that her results were introversion, intuition, feeling, and perception, or INFP. Even though her results did not align with the Myers-Briggs military personality type, it did not discourage her from pursuing the military.

SSG LeeAnn Boaz plays the bassoon for the 38th Infantry Division Band. She’s also the lead vocalist for the Indiana Army National Guard. (Photo by Staff Sgt. Ashley Westfall).

SSG LeeAnn Boaz plays the bassoon for the 38th Infantry Division Band. She’s also the lead vocalist for the Indiana Army National Guard. (Photo by Staff Sgt. Ashley Westfall).

“I knew I wanted to join the military, but I also wanted to be a professional musician. So, I began reaching out to recruiters in search of a military band.”

After meeting with local Navy and Air Force recruiters, SSG Boaz says a friend told her about the 38th Infantry Division Band in Indianapolis. Since she was already attending a local college, it felt like the perfect opportunity. In September 2004, SSG Boaz began her journey in the Indiana Army National Guard as a 42R Army Bandperson.

After completing Basic Training, she was assigned to the 38th Infantry Division Band as a bassoon instrumentalist. She recalls dusting off a bassoon that had not been touched in decades, and with all eyes on her, she played her first warm-up tune.

SSG Boaz continued to perform and excel as the primary bassoonist, but eventually her vocal talents resonated with her bandmates. At a young age, she performed with the Indianapolis Children’s Choir, but being a vocalist came second to the bassoon. In 2009, the Defense Department asked her to participate in a pilot program for military vocalists at The School of Music in Norfolk, Va.

“Knowing Boaz, I wholeheartedly believe this attributed to her increased level of self-confidence and elevated her ability to perform in front of an audience,” says Lieutenant Colonel (LTC) Lisa Kopczynski, the officer in charge of Indiana National Guard vocalists.

SSG Boaz now performs with the 38th Infantry Division Band and the ceremonial unit music section. She has become the lead vocalist for the Indiana National Guard, and is often asked to sing at venues like the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, Lucas Oil Stadium, and the Indiana War Memorial. All of this strengthened her character as a leader and noncommissioned officer.

“From these experiences, her stage presence and ability to connect to any audience took flight,” says LTC Kopczynski. “She has continued to excel in her performance, guiding her to be the leader she is today.”

By 2013, SSG Boaz was working full-time for the Guard, and was married with a second child on the way. The pregnancy brought new challenges that significantly changed her path as a service member. Her son was delivered through a cesarean section surgery, which led to a very difficult and traumatic recovery. She had worked hard to stay fit and healthy through the pregnancy so she would not struggle through her next annual Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT).

“You don’t realize how much you use your abdomen until it is cut open,” she says. “I vowed to get back up within four weeks so that I could start getting ready for my fitness test.”

SSG Boaz says running was never her strength, and she always struggled to pass APFT. After all, music was her passion, not fitness. She recalled the criticism she received in high school when she tried out for cross country, which broke down her confidence as a runner. She knew it was time to overcome that fear, so she built up the courage to ask co-workers if she could join them during their morning or afternoon runs.

“I had no idea I could enjoy running, but they gave me so much positive feedback and inspiration, that I ran my first 5K on Oct. 13, 2013, just one month after my C-section.”

From that day forward, SSG Boaz completed dozens of races to include two mini marathons. In 2016, she received her first APFT badge, feeling healthier than ever. With her confidence lifted, SSG Boaz knew she was ready for another challenge, so she signed up for the Master Fitness Trainer (MFT) course.

At the MFT course, SSG Boaz felt she was at the bottom of the totem pole, and being one of only two women at the course, the atmosphere was intimidating. SSG Boaz fought through the physical and mental obstacles, and completed the course in April 2017.

SSG Boaz is now working on her license to be a civilian fitness trainer and nutritionist, something she never felt a shy band member would achieve. She now enjoys fitness so much that she plans and executes fitness events for her unit. Those efforts have paid off, too.

“Her leadership and knowledge as the unit Master Fitness Trainer has helped the unit achieve the best pass or fail APFT percentage in several years,” says Sergeant First Class (SFC) Angela Seeley, readiness noncommissioned officer for the band.

“If you had asked me 10 years ago if I would ever be a confident fitness leader for my unit, I would have said you are crazy,” says SSG Boaz.

Curious about how Myers-Briggs would rate her personality type now, Boaz retook the test in March. She now rates as extroversion, intuition, feeling and perception, or the ENFP personality type. She understood her previous personality type, but it did not stop her from taking a chance to become a military musician.

So that’s how one shy band geek transformed into an extrovert and a confident leader in the Indiana Army National Guard.

Being a Soldier in the Guard means serving your community and country while making a difference. The Guard provides education assistance, and offers training in more than 150 career fields including engineering, logistics, infantry, and administration. Reach out to your local recruiter to learn more.

From an original article by SSG Ashley Westfall, Indiana Army National Guard, which appeared in the Guard News section of NationalGuard.mil in December.

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Australian Native Comes ‘Full Circle’ as D.C. Army Guard Vocalist

SGT Vicki Golding

SGT Vicki Golding, a vocalist with the District of Columbia Army National Guard’s 257th Army Band, sings the Australian national anthem as part of the Centenary of Mateship celebration during the Twilight Tattoo on June 27, 2018, at Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall, Va. SGT Golding, an Australian native who now lives in the U.S., also performed “The Star-Spangled Banner,” and “I Am Australian” at the event, which commemorated the 100-year anniversary of the partnership between the United States and Australia established during World War I. (Photo by Tech. Sgt. Erich B. Smith.)

ARLINGTON, Va. – For Sergeant (SGT) Vicki Golding, a vocalist with the District of Columbia Army National Guard’s 257th Army Band, performing during the recent Centenary of Mateship celebration event was, in a way, about coming full circle.

The celebration, held in Virginia, marked the 100-year alliance between the United States and Australia, and was a fitting opportunity for SGT Golding, a Brisbane, Australia, native who now lives in the U.S.

“In terms of representing both countries, this event felt like it was ready-made for me,” says SGT Golding, who was approached by Australian Embassy officials to perform at the event once they learned she was vocalist in the D.C. Army Guard.

“It wasn’t lost on me on what a big deal this was for a girl from Brisbane – ending up here in D.C. with the best military band in the country.”

Her journey from “Down Under” to singing in the 257th Army Band started in childhood where she was part of a family musical act with her three sisters and brother. Her father, whom SGT Golding described as the “essential music man,” led the group.

“My father was a music teacher and an opera singer and was a very technical musician. He was just the sort of person [who] would make you want to do better.”

While the music bug subsided for her siblings, SGT Golding’s love of performing continued.

Following the footsteps of a high school friend, she enlisted in the Australian army as a musician, eventually landing a position as a vocalist.

When the United States Army Band “Pershing’s Own” performed during an international tattoo (military entertainment performance) in Brisbane, SGT Golding says she was captivated by the variety of music they played.

“They had a rock band and a rhythm section along with the trombone section,” she says, adding she felt she was witnessing the “sheer talent of a premier band.”

Years later, marriage to an American brought her to the Washington, D.C., area.

Though she had left the Australian army, SGT Golding says she was still interested in serving and performing. That led her to reach out to Soldiers she knew from “Pershing’s Own,” who suggested the 257th Army Band as a good fit.

She followed the suggestion and enlisted in the Guard in 2003, even though the band didn’t have a singer vacancy at the time.

“When I first joined the 257th, I had videos and demos of me singing, and I said, ‘Look, I can play tuba, I can play percussion, but I really want to sing for you guys.’”

Eventually, a vocalist position opened up, and she wasted no time in securing her new role. Now, SGT Golding performs more than 35 shows a year, representing the D.C. Army Guard and the Army as a vocalist.

She says she thrives off the excitement of large-scale shows, especially in stadiums when she sings “The Star-Spangled Banner.”

“It’s a sacred piece that never gets old because there’s this energy that comes from the audience. You can feel the audience just waiting for you to sing it to them.”

But it was a military funeral for a D.C. Guard member lost in battle that she will never forget.

“I was singing the national anthem, maybe 10 feet away was his family, and I remember struggling.”

Years of performing in uniform, however, provided the focus needed to sing the song through.

“They had just lost their family member,” says SGT Golding. “If I can’t suck it up for 90 seconds, be professional, and do my job when they lost just about everything – that’s just not acceptable to me.”

SGT Golding brings that same kind of discipline and love of music to the civilian side, volunteering at non-profit organizations that cater to military spouses and veterans who use musical therapy to treat post-traumatic stress.

“I have been blessed with musical abilities, and any time I feel I am not using them, I feel like I am wasting something that was given to me,” she says. “And so I want to share what I have been given, whether it’s performing, teaching, or writing musical arrangements – whatever that might be.”

SGT Golding adds that her civilian experiences working with non-profit organizations, plus keeping abreast of popular music trends, help broaden her horizons as a military vocalist.

“It’s not a bad thing to think outside of the box,” she says. “Because if things aren’t flexible, they’ll break sometimes.”

While SGT Golding says the pinnacle of her musical ambition is performing on a network show back in her native country, she is thrilled with being a singing Soldier and sharing the same kind of camaraderie in the D.C. Army Guard as she felt in Australia.

“The common thread between the two militaries is the sense of family,” she says. “It was a real lifeline for me in Australia, and the same is true here in America.”

So if you’re looking for a way to use your talents and work on a team that becomes like a second family, consider joining the Army National Guard, where you can be an Army Bandperson like SGT Golding, or just about anything else you can imagine.

That’s because the Guard offers training in more than 150 careers, and you can research all of them on our job board by State, category, or keyword. Learn more about how you can serve part-time in the Guard and take advantage of its benefits like money for college by contacting your local recruiter.

From an original article by Tech. Sgt. Erich Smith, National Guard Bureau, which appeared in the news section of NationalGuard.mil in June.

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