A Guard Soldier’s Journey from Truck Driver to Attorney

In his eight years of part-time service with the Illinois Army National Guard, Jacob Smith has gotten some big benefits – leadership skills, a sense of direction in life, and his undergraduate and law degrees, courtesy of the Guard’s education benefits.

And now this former 88M Truck Driver is putting his law degree to work as the newest officer in the Illinois Guard’s Judge Advocate General (JAG) Corps, the branch of the Guard that serves as a legal resource for Soldiers, Guard units, and the State Adjutant General.

“It is an interesting contrast,” says First Lieutenant (1LT) Smith of his switch in military occupational specialties (MOSs) from driving large vehicles to now advising his colleagues on legal matters.

“Being a JAG officer is more applicable to my civilian career,” he says. “It will broaden my base of legal experience and knowledge.”

Growing up, 1LT Smith had positive impressions of becoming an attorney, having worked in his family’s law firm, and of military service because his father had served in the active duty Army and later the Illinois Army National Guard.

After starting college, 1LT Smith decided to serve in the military.

“I thought the Guard would be a good way to do both at the same time.”

1LT Jacob Smith has gone from 88M Truck Driver to an officer in the Illinois Army National Guard’s Judge Advocate General Corps.

1LT Jacob Smith has gone from 88M Truck Driver to an officer in the Illinois Army National Guard’s Judge Advocate General Corps.

He chose 88M because Illinois has a lot of transportation units, and the MOS had a relatively short training schedule. His Advanced Individual Training could be squeezed into a summer between semesters, plus he could drill close to school.

And because of his State’s tuition assistance, 1LT Smith estimates he has saved somewhere in the ballpark of $100,000 in tuition for his undergrad and law degrees. On top of that, the GI Bill helped with living expenses while he was in school.

“These are huge benefits on the financial side,” says 1LT Smith, 26, who’s also hoping to take advantage of another Guard benefit in the next few years – VA home loan eligibility – which allows Soldiers to buy a home with little to no down payment.

1LT Smith, who’s been an attorney since 2017, just recently completed his JAG Corps training, a two-part process. First, he attended the 6-week Direct Commission Course at Fort Benning, and then he spent 10 ½ weeks at the Judge Advocate General’s Legal Center and School in Virginia where he received “a crash course in many areas of military law.”

As a judge advocate in his new unit, 1LT Smith expects to do a fair amount of what’s called administrative law. This includes participating in administrative separation boards used to determine whether a Soldier should be discharged from the Guard because of misconduct. In such cases, the Soldier would appear before a board instead of in a courtroom.

“It’s one tool used by commanders to more efficiently deal with certain misconduct, rather than pursuing a court-martial process.”

Judge advocates often deal with cases involving criminal offenses as well, which is a departure from 1LT Smith’s full-time civilian law career, where he focuses on business law, estate planning, and commercial real estate and banking matters.

As a JAG officer, he’ll also be handling cases related to property law. 1LT Smith explains that typically a commander would initiate an investigation if a sensitive and valuable item like a pair of night vision goggles was lost to determine if someone should be held liable. A JAG officer would review the findings to make sure they are legally sufficient.

One of 1LT Smith’s goals for the future is to deploy overseas and work in operational law: “the laws of war, advising commanders in an overseas environment on whether they can legally engage certain targets, spend money on particular projects, and what are the repercussions for taking certain actions in a combat environment,” he says. “It’s an area of law where there’s not really a civilian equivalent.”

Overall, 1LT Smith says his time in the Guard has given him direction in his life, great people to serve with, and an opportunity to give back.

“The opportunity to serve comes with sacrifices, certainly, but I get to carry on a civilian career and work with incredible leaders and friends,” he says. “It adds tremendous value to my life.”

So, if you’re looking for a way to serve your community and your country part-time while you pursue a civilian career, you should speak to an Army National Guard recruiter. Besides outstanding education benefits, the Guard also offers training in more than 130 career fields.

Search our job board for details on careers in engineering, administration, infantry, armor and field artillery, aviation, medicine, military police, intelligence, mechanic and maintenance, transportation, and logistics support.

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Guard Offering $20k for Certain Jobs, but Benefits of Service Go Beyond the Bonus, Says Recruiter

Kyle Deleon, left, is one of the newest members of the North Carolina Army National Guard. Recruited by SSG Phillip Wongsing, right, Kyle received a $20,000 bonus for enlisting as a 13M Multiple Launch Rocket System (MLRS) Crewmember in January.Kyle Deleon, left, is one of the newest members of the North Carolina Army National Guard. Recruited by SSG Phillip Wongsing, right, Kyle received a $20,000 bonus for enlisting as a 13M Multiple Launch Rocket System (MLRS) Crewmember in January.

Out of the approximately 130 jobs you can do in the Army National Guard, there’s a list of a dozen or so of these jobs in every State that is offering new enlistees a $20,000 bonus right now.

Staff Sergeant (SSG) Phillip Wongsing, a recruiter for the North Carolina Army National Guard, is quick to clear up any misconceptions that the military occupational specialties (MOSs) that make the list are jobs that no one wants to do.

“You get everything from plumbing to aviation to infantry to armor,” he says. “These are really good jobs – a variety of jobs in different career fields.”

The list varies from State to State and changes on a quarterly basis.

“It’s based on what the State needs at the moment to fill in positions, so we don’t have critical vulnerabilities within our organization,” says SSG Wongsing.

For example, as of this month in North Carolina, bonuses are available for 17 jobs this quarter. Here are just a few examples to demonstrate the variety:

The bonus is tied to a score of at least 50 on the ASVAB and to a 6-year enlistment in the Army National Guard, says SSG Wongsing. And, by the way, that’s six years of part-time service – as little as one weekend a month for drill and two weeks in the summer for annual training.

Here’s how the bonus works: Soldiers receive half the money when they successfully complete Basic Training and Advanced Individual Training. On their third-year anniversary they receive another quarter of the bonus. The final quarter arrives for their fifth anniversary.

But even if the MOS you want doesn’t come with a bonus, there are other financial incentives to think about. One is money for college. Because Army National Guard Soldiers have a dual mission to serve the State and the Nation, Soldiers can take advantage of both State and federal tuition assistance. SSG Wongsing says the North Carolina Army National Guard offers:

  • $4,500 a year for in-State college tuition reimbursement
  • $4,000 a year for federal tuition assistance
  • $384 a month for the GI Bill (paid directly to the Soldier for expenses)
  • $350 a month for the GI Bill Kicker (with a minimum ASVAB score of 50)

Affordable health insurance offered through the Guard is another way to save money. At $42 a month for medical and about $11 a month for dental, SSG Wongsing estimates that single North Carolina Guard Soldiers are paying about a quarter of what their civilian counterparts do.

Of course, money isn’t everything. Doing a job you like has its own rewards.

One of SSG Wongsing’s recent recruits may not have gotten a $20,000 bonus for enlisting as an 15Q Air Traffic Control Operator, but by the time he graduates college, he’ll have five years of paid training and experience in his field, which applies directly to a civilian career.

There are other motivations to serve in the Guard, too.

“If you have a heart for humanitarian work and adventure, then the National Guard is the place to be,” says SSG Wongsing, who helped distribute supplies to residents displaced by two hurricanes that hit North Carolina in 2018. The Guard also helped with evacuations, water rescues and storm clean up.

“You directly have a hand in the rehabilitation of your community and helping people in a time of stress,” he says.

If you’re into travel, there are opportunities to attend trainings in other States or countries. The North Carolina Guard, for example, is partnered with Botswana and Moldova through the State Partnership Program.

There’s also some friendly competition among the ranks. SSG Wongsing’s former armor company for example, won the Sullivan Cup in 2016, competing against the Marines and other Army units for the best tank crew, and then went on to finish third in an international competition. Last year, the New York Army National Guard sent athletes to the Winter Olympics, and then, there’s the annual Best Warrior Competition, a test of a Soldier’s knowledge and physical endurance.

And while most Soldiers serve part-time and have civilian jobs or go to school, there are also full-time jobs available in the Guard.

“The Guard is what you make of it,” says SSG Wongsing. “If you want to go to school full-time, and you still want to serve your community, have self-sovereignty in your life, and serve something bigger than yourself, the National Guard is a great opportunity to have two different lifestyles – the civilian and military that supplement each other.”

So, if you’re interested in what the Guard has to offer, our job board is a great place to start. You can search by keyword, State, or career field, such as logisticsadministrationengineeringintelligence, and more. For information about enlistment bonuses and benefits available in your State, contact your local recruiter.

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Gaining Strength Through the Power of Music

INDIANAPOLIS – A quiet 17-year-old from the band halls of R. Nelson Snider High School discovered a lot about herself when she decided to join the military to pursue her love of music.

“I was a passive and quiet band geek that lived and breathed band hall,” says Staff Sergeant (SSG) LeeAnn Boaz. “First period was band and orchestra, second period was choir, third period was music theory, and fourth period would be either math or English.”

During her senior year in high school, SSG Boaz began taking college courses to continue her education in music. Later, she received her bachelor’s degree in psychology, as it was the closest field to music therapy that Indiana University-Purdue University offered.

SSG Boaz recalled taking a personality test at the university called the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator test. It was no surprise to SSG Boaz that her results were introversion, intuition, feeling, and perception, or INFP. Even though her results did not align with the Myers-Briggs military personality type, it did not discourage her from pursuing the military.

SSG LeeAnn Boaz plays the bassoon for the 38th Infantry Division Band. She’s also the lead vocalist for the Indiana Army National Guard. (Photo by Staff Sgt. Ashley Westfall).

SSG LeeAnn Boaz plays the bassoon for the 38th Infantry Division Band. She’s also the lead vocalist for the Indiana Army National Guard. (Photo by Staff Sgt. Ashley Westfall).

“I knew I wanted to join the military, but I also wanted to be a professional musician. So, I began reaching out to recruiters in search of a military band.”

After meeting with local Navy and Air Force recruiters, SSG Boaz says a friend told her about the 38th Infantry Division Band in Indianapolis. Since she was already attending a local college, it felt like the perfect opportunity. In September 2004, SSG Boaz began her journey in the Indiana Army National Guard as a 42R Army Bandperson.

After completing Basic Training, she was assigned to the 38th Infantry Division Band as a bassoon instrumentalist. She recalls dusting off a bassoon that had not been touched in decades, and with all eyes on her, she played her first warm-up tune.

SSG Boaz continued to perform and excel as the primary bassoonist, but eventually her vocal talents resonated with her bandmates. At a young age, she performed with the Indianapolis Children’s Choir, but being a vocalist came second to the bassoon. In 2009, the Defense Department asked her to participate in a pilot program for military vocalists at The School of Music in Norfolk, Va.

“Knowing Boaz, I wholeheartedly believe this attributed to her increased level of self-confidence and elevated her ability to perform in front of an audience,” says Lieutenant Colonel (LTC) Lisa Kopczynski, the officer in charge of Indiana National Guard vocalists.

SSG Boaz now performs with the 38th Infantry Division Band and the ceremonial unit music section. She has become the lead vocalist for the Indiana National Guard, and is often asked to sing at venues like the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, Lucas Oil Stadium, and the Indiana War Memorial. All of this strengthened her character as a leader and noncommissioned officer.

“From these experiences, her stage presence and ability to connect to any audience took flight,” says LTC Kopczynski. “She has continued to excel in her performance, guiding her to be the leader she is today.”

By 2013, SSG Boaz was working full-time for the Guard, and was married with a second child on the way. The pregnancy brought new challenges that significantly changed her path as a service member. Her son was delivered through a cesarean section surgery, which led to a very difficult and traumatic recovery. She had worked hard to stay fit and healthy through the pregnancy so she would not struggle through her next annual Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT).

“You don’t realize how much you use your abdomen until it is cut open,” she says. “I vowed to get back up within four weeks so that I could start getting ready for my fitness test.”

SSG Boaz says running was never her strength, and she always struggled to pass APFT. After all, music was her passion, not fitness. She recalled the criticism she received in high school when she tried out for cross country, which broke down her confidence as a runner. She knew it was time to overcome that fear, so she built up the courage to ask co-workers if she could join them during their morning or afternoon runs.

“I had no idea I could enjoy running, but they gave me so much positive feedback and inspiration, that I ran my first 5K on Oct. 13, 2013, just one month after my C-section.”

From that day forward, SSG Boaz completed dozens of races to include two mini marathons. In 2016, she received her first APFT badge, feeling healthier than ever. With her confidence lifted, SSG Boaz knew she was ready for another challenge, so she signed up for the Master Fitness Trainer (MFT) course.

At the MFT course, SSG Boaz felt she was at the bottom of the totem pole, and being one of only two women at the course, the atmosphere was intimidating. SSG Boaz fought through the physical and mental obstacles, and completed the course in April 2017.

SSG Boaz is now working on her license to be a civilian fitness trainer and nutritionist, something she never felt a shy band member would achieve. She now enjoys fitness so much that she plans and executes fitness events for her unit. Those efforts have paid off, too.

“Her leadership and knowledge as the unit Master Fitness Trainer has helped the unit achieve the best pass or fail APFT percentage in several years,” says Sergeant First Class (SFC) Angela Seeley, readiness noncommissioned officer for the band.

“If you had asked me 10 years ago if I would ever be a confident fitness leader for my unit, I would have said you are crazy,” says SSG Boaz.

Curious about how Myers-Briggs would rate her personality type now, Boaz retook the test in March. She now rates as extroversion, intuition, feeling and perception, or the ENFP personality type. She understood her previous personality type, but it did not stop her from taking a chance to become a military musician.

So that’s how one shy band geek transformed into an extrovert and a confident leader in the Indiana Army National Guard.

Being a Soldier in the Guard means serving your community and country while making a difference. The Guard provides education assistance, and offers training in more than 150 career fields including engineering, logistics, infantry, and administration. Reach out to your local recruiter to learn more.

From an original article by SSG Ashley Westfall, Indiana Army National Guard, which appeared in the Guard News section of NationalGuard.mil in December.

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