Indiana National Guard Major Helps Manage 11,000 Troops Overseas

Indiana Army National Guard MAJ Dan Taylor, 38th Infantry Division Deputy Personnel Officer, at Camp Arifjan, Kuwait. (Photo by MSG Jeff Lowry.)
Indiana Army National Guard MAJ Dan Taylor, 38th Infantry Division Deputy Personnel Officer, at Camp Arifjan, Kuwait. (Photo by MSG Jeff Lowry.)

CAMP ARIFJAN, Kuwait – For Army National Guard Major (MAJ) Dan Taylor of the 38th Infantry Division, helping to manage some 11,000 U.S. service members supporting Task Force Spartan in the Middle East is just what he signed up for.

“It is important for me to be part of something bigger than just myself,” says the Rochester, Ind., native.

MAJ Taylor, the division’s Deputy Personnel Officer, and approximately 600 Soldiers departed the Hoosier State in May to deploy to the Middle East to support Task Force Spartan, which helps strengthen defense relationships, build partner capacity, and deter aggression in the region.

“The National Guard has also allowed me to meet interesting people and go to different places,” says MAJ Taylor, who joined the military in 1995. “Our missions, whether at home or abroad, have far-reaching impacts.”

MAJ Taylor first joined the active-duty Army as a 91B Light-wheel Vehicle Mechanic.

“Enlisting provided me with a trade and a lot of personal development,” he says. “My time on active duty gave me the confidence needed to attend college. In 2001, I decided to get out of the Army to attend college.”

MAJ Taylor earned his undergraduate degree in business and human resource management from Indiana University Kokomo, his master’s in business administration from Purdue Fort Wayne, and another degree in human resources and employment relations from Penn State University.

“Once I finished grad school in 2006, I decided to join the National Guard to continue to serve,” says Taylor. “I was fortunate to branch Adjutant General Corps, which aligned with my civilian goals.”

Adjutant General Corps Soldiers focus on personnel, human resources, and strength management for the U.S. Army.

“Through the National Guard, I was able to be formally trained in human resources, which eventually helped me secure a civilian HR role,” says Taylor. “Since then, my Army HR training has augmented my development as an HR professional.”

The Army National Guard’s admin and relations experts take care of the needs of Soldiers – and the organization as a whole. From human resources and finances to legal aid and religious services, these Soldiers provide responsive assistance to personnel needs. Whether assisting an employee with pay, managing career progressions, or handling public relations for the organization, these Soldiers learn skills that directly translate to the civilian sector.

When not serving in the Army National Guard, MAJ Taylor works as a benefits representative at Allison Transmission in Speedway, Ind.

While the Army training helped MAJ Taylor procure his civilian job, he said he also sees other altruistic benefits to being in the military and serving in the National Guard.

“I am privileged to be able to serve both the State and the country. My family and my work are both very supportive of my service.”

Citizen-Soldiers like MAJ Taylor primarily serve part-time in their home States, enabling them to further their careers while staying close to home. They earn benefits to help pay for education and expenses while serving their country and their community.

With more than 130 positions in career fields ranging from heavy weapons to transportation to intelligence, you can find your perfect fit. Check out the job board for more information on available careers, and contact a local recruiter to learn more. 

From an original article by MSG Jeff Lowry, 38th Infantry Division, which appeared in the news section of NationalGuard.mil in November 2019.

Share on FacebookShare on Twitter

Guard Soldier’s Service Inspired by Dad, Destiny, and Girl in a Grocery Store

Not long after immigrating to Indiana from her native Honduras, a young Arely Elrod encountered a “beautiful girl in a uniform” at a grocery store.

It wasn’t a military dress uniform, just your everyday fatigues, but the pre-teen was transfixed. She hadn’t realized that girls could be Soldiers.

Initially, Arely’s mother dismissed her daughter’s interest in the military as a phase. No – her daughter was destined to be an attorney, a doctor, or an engineer. But Arely felt a stronger pull toward a career in discipline that never really let go.

Now 32, Corporal (CPL) Elrod proudly wears a uniform as part of the Indiana Army National Guard.

“When I put that uniform on I feel alive. I feel like I belong somewhere.”

That somewhere can be elbow deep in an engine compartment – she’s a 91L Construction Vehicle Repairer – or singing in front of a crowd of thousands as part of the Indiana National Guard’s ceremonial unit.             

Before joining the Guard, CPL Elrod had enlisted in the Army in 2008 after trying to make it in L.A. in modeling, acting, and music.

“I wanted to get out of my comfort zone. Modeling is easy for me. I wanted to do something that was unexpected. I wanted to explore the world and see what I have to offer this earth, what I have to offer this country.”

CPL Arely Elrod (formerly Rosario) of the Indiana Army National Guard.

CPL Arely Elrod (formerly Rosario) of the Indiana Army National Guard.

Working as a mechanic on heavy machinery like bulldozers was both an unexpected choice for the 5-foot-1, self-described “girly” Soldier, and far outside her comfort zone.

“The only thing I had done to a car before was drive it, and I barely knew how to put gas in it.”

After a tour in Afghanistan, where she lost some friends, CPL Elrod came back to the States, got the therapy she needed to deal with her combat experiences, got married, moved to Florida, left the Army, and had a son.

When her marriage ended, she moved back to Indiana to go to law school, but found out it wasn’t for her. Plus, she missed the camaraderie of being in the military.

She signed on with the Guard on March 7, 2016 – a date she knows by heart.

“It’s the day I decided to take my life into my own hands and into my destiny,” she says. “I wanted to remind myself how strong I was. I picked up what I remembered and joined the National Guard. It has been the ride of a lifetime.”

As part of the Indiana Army National Guard’s ceremonial unit, CPL Elrod, pictured with her husband, John, and her son, Louie, has sung at many high-profile sporting events including an Indianapolis Colts game.

As part of the Indiana Army National Guard’s ceremonial unit, CPL Elrod, pictured with her husband, John, and her son, Louie, has sung at many high-profile sporting events including an Indianapolis Colts game.

CPL Elrod takes satisfaction in knowing that her mechanical expertise keeps her fellow Soldiers safe, but what she really loves is performing in the ceremonial unit. She has sung at events ranging from retirement ceremonies for 30 people to sporting events like the Indianapolis 500, and Indianapolis Colts and Indians games.

“It’s my passion and being able to combine both things – what I love to do with music, and being able to support my State and country – that’s the best combination to me.”

The flexibility of serving part-time with the Guard also gives her time to pursue other interests. CPL Elrod and her husband recently started a maintenance, cleaning, and landscaping business, and on the side, she does makeup and microblading.

CPL Elrod says she felt destined to do something in a field that involves discipline and to be of service, traits instilled in her by her father who had passed away before the family left Honduras.

“My biological father was so loving, so selfless. He did more for others than he did for himself.”

Besides volunteering in Indianapolis to impress upon her son how blessed their family is, she wants to serve her community in a new way by becoming a police officer.

She’ll find out in December if she’s accepted by the academy.

“Because of the skills I’ve learned in the military, I’ve passed everything with flying colors – my physical, my written exams, and my oral exams.”

If it doesn’t work out, she wouldn’t mind exploring a medical career instead and moving up the ranks in the Guard.

“I’m always looking for things I can do,” she says.

So, if you’re looking to leave your comfort zone behind and serve something bigger than yourself, consider joining the Army National Guard, which offers great education benefits and careers in fields like engineering, aviation, armor and field artillery, and transportation. Contact your local recruiter for more information.

Share on FacebookShare on Twitter

Gaining Strength Through the Power of Music

INDIANAPOLIS – A quiet 17-year-old from the band halls of R. Nelson Snider High School discovered a lot about herself when she decided to join the military to pursue her love of music.

“I was a passive and quiet band geek that lived and breathed band hall,” says Staff Sergeant (SSG) LeeAnn Boaz. “First period was band and orchestra, second period was choir, third period was music theory, and fourth period would be either math or English.”

During her senior year in high school, SSG Boaz began taking college courses to continue her education in music. Later, she received her bachelor’s degree in psychology, as it was the closest field to music therapy that Indiana University-Purdue University offered.

SSG Boaz recalled taking a personality test at the university called the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator test. It was no surprise to SSG Boaz that her results were introversion, intuition, feeling, and perception, or INFP. Even though her results did not align with the Myers-Briggs military personality type, it did not discourage her from pursuing the military.

SSG LeeAnn Boaz plays the bassoon for the 38th Infantry Division Band. She’s also the lead vocalist for the Indiana Army National Guard. (Photo by Staff Sgt. Ashley Westfall).

SSG LeeAnn Boaz plays the bassoon for the 38th Infantry Division Band. She’s also the lead vocalist for the Indiana Army National Guard. (Photo by Staff Sgt. Ashley Westfall).

“I knew I wanted to join the military, but I also wanted to be a professional musician. So, I began reaching out to recruiters in search of a military band.”

After meeting with local Navy and Air Force recruiters, SSG Boaz says a friend told her about the 38th Infantry Division Band in Indianapolis. Since she was already attending a local college, it felt like the perfect opportunity. In September 2004, SSG Boaz began her journey in the Indiana Army National Guard as a 42R Army Bandperson.

After completing Basic Training, she was assigned to the 38th Infantry Division Band as a bassoon instrumentalist. She recalls dusting off a bassoon that had not been touched in decades, and with all eyes on her, she played her first warm-up tune.

SSG Boaz continued to perform and excel as the primary bassoonist, but eventually her vocal talents resonated with her bandmates. At a young age, she performed with the Indianapolis Children’s Choir, but being a vocalist came second to the bassoon. In 2009, the Defense Department asked her to participate in a pilot program for military vocalists at The School of Music in Norfolk, Va.

“Knowing Boaz, I wholeheartedly believe this attributed to her increased level of self-confidence and elevated her ability to perform in front of an audience,” says Lieutenant Colonel (LTC) Lisa Kopczynski, the officer in charge of Indiana National Guard vocalists.

SSG Boaz now performs with the 38th Infantry Division Band and the ceremonial unit music section. She has become the lead vocalist for the Indiana National Guard, and is often asked to sing at venues like the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, Lucas Oil Stadium, and the Indiana War Memorial. All of this strengthened her character as a leader and noncommissioned officer.

“From these experiences, her stage presence and ability to connect to any audience took flight,” says LTC Kopczynski. “She has continued to excel in her performance, guiding her to be the leader she is today.”

By 2013, SSG Boaz was working full-time for the Guard, and was married with a second child on the way. The pregnancy brought new challenges that significantly changed her path as a service member. Her son was delivered through a cesarean section surgery, which led to a very difficult and traumatic recovery. She had worked hard to stay fit and healthy through the pregnancy so she would not struggle through her next annual Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT).

“You don’t realize how much you use your abdomen until it is cut open,” she says. “I vowed to get back up within four weeks so that I could start getting ready for my fitness test.”

SSG Boaz says running was never her strength, and she always struggled to pass APFT. After all, music was her passion, not fitness. She recalled the criticism she received in high school when she tried out for cross country, which broke down her confidence as a runner. She knew it was time to overcome that fear, so she built up the courage to ask co-workers if she could join them during their morning or afternoon runs.

“I had no idea I could enjoy running, but they gave me so much positive feedback and inspiration, that I ran my first 5K on Oct. 13, 2013, just one month after my C-section.”

From that day forward, SSG Boaz completed dozens of races to include two mini marathons. In 2016, she received her first APFT badge, feeling healthier than ever. With her confidence lifted, SSG Boaz knew she was ready for another challenge, so she signed up for the Master Fitness Trainer (MFT) course.

At the MFT course, SSG Boaz felt she was at the bottom of the totem pole, and being one of only two women at the course, the atmosphere was intimidating. SSG Boaz fought through the physical and mental obstacles, and completed the course in April 2017.

SSG Boaz is now working on her license to be a civilian fitness trainer and nutritionist, something she never felt a shy band member would achieve. She now enjoys fitness so much that she plans and executes fitness events for her unit. Those efforts have paid off, too.

“Her leadership and knowledge as the unit Master Fitness Trainer has helped the unit achieve the best pass or fail APFT percentage in several years,” says Sergeant First Class (SFC) Angela Seeley, readiness noncommissioned officer for the band.

“If you had asked me 10 years ago if I would ever be a confident fitness leader for my unit, I would have said you are crazy,” says SSG Boaz.

Curious about how Myers-Briggs would rate her personality type now, Boaz retook the test in March. She now rates as extroversion, intuition, feeling and perception, or the ENFP personality type. She understood her previous personality type, but it did not stop her from taking a chance to become a military musician.

So that’s how one shy band geek transformed into an extrovert and a confident leader in the Indiana Army National Guard.

Being a Soldier in the Guard means serving your community and country while making a difference. The Guard provides education assistance, and offers training in more than 150 career fields including engineering, logistics, infantry, and administration. Reach out to your local recruiter to learn more.

From an original article by SSG Ashley Westfall, Indiana Army National Guard, which appeared in the Guard News section of NationalGuard.mil in December.

Share on FacebookShare on Twitter