Army National Guard Offers a Way to Pay Federal Student Loans

One of the Army National Guard’s best selling points is its ability to help pay for its Soldiers’ educations.

There are many paths to earning a degree without incurring a ton of debt or any debt at all, like the Guard’s Federal and State tuition assistance programs, but one benefit the Guard offers – the Student Loan Repayment Program – can pay down balances on Federal student loans a Soldier already has.

CPT Peter Brookes, the Enlisted Incentives Program Manager with the Army National Guard, explains: “The gist of it is that we pay 15% or $500 a year of the overall Federal student loans you have when you join the Guard, up to $50,000, inclusive of interest for a 6 year commitment.”

The most important caveat for the program, says CPT Brookes, is that the money goes to the lending institution – not the Soldier. Also, it’s not a one-time check to the lender. For example, for a Guard member who has $50,000 in Federal student loans, the Guard would pay 15% per each individual loan of that balance, up to $7,500 per year.

The Student Loan Repayment Program (SLRP) applies to only Federal loans. State loans and private loans do not qualify.

There are also requirements associated with a Soldier’s status within the Guard. Different standards apply for new Soldiers coming in with no prior service, Soldiers who have prior military service, and those who are already serving in the Guard.

CPT Brookes says for anyone new coming into the Guard, there are three basic eligibility requirements for SLRP – Soldiers must be high school graduates who are moving into a vacant position in the Guard and have a minimum Armed Forces Qualifying Test score of 50 and established Federal student loan debt.

As of this writing, CPT Brookes says new Soldiers can pick one of three incentives between SLRP, the Montgomery GI Bill Kicker, which is $350 a month that goes to a Soldier who’s enrolled in college, for up to 36 months, or a Non-Prior Service Enlistment Bonus for $7,500.

Some of those incentives can be combined with the Guard’s education benefits, which CPT Brookes describes as “unparalleled.”

“When you consider that for the vast majority of us, [Guard service] is a part-time job, it’s pretty phenomenal, he says. “I can’t even think of a civilian equivalent out there for education benefits for a part-time job.”

Not only can Soldiers take advantage of potentially earning free degrees through State Tuition Assistance Programs (programs vary by State), “you can still go and get your [Montgomery GI Bill] Kicker as well,” says CPT Brookes. “So basically you’re getting paid to go to college.”

NationalGuard.com outlines all of the Guard’s benefits, but CPT Brookes says recruiters are the best source for information on benefits, incentives, or bonuses that apply to each State.

Your local recruiter can also help you decide on the job you’ll train to do in the Guard, called your Military Occupational Specialty (MOS). For more information on Guard careers, check out our job board, where you can research more than 150 options in fields ranging from administration, to infantry, engineering, military intelligence, and more.

Share on FacebookShare on Twitter

State Spotlight: Washington

Combat Medic Skills Help Soldier Save Lives in His Civilian Job

CAMP MURRAY, Wash. – When Deputy Sergio Sanchez arrived at the scene of a drive-by shooting during a night patrol shift with the Pierce County Sheriff’s Department in Spanaway, Wash., he found a man bleeding from his leg.

Sanchez, 28, a six-year veteran in law enforcement, exited his squad car with his personal first aid kit and instantly went to work.

The victim had a bullet wound that went straight through his leg and was bleeding profusely. Within minutes, Sanchez stabilized the man’s injuries with gauze and a tourniquet for transport to the local hospital.

Sanchez didn’t learn his life-saving skills on the police force. He also serves as a combat medic (68W Health Care Specialist) with the Washington Army National Guard‘s Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 2nd Battalion, 146th Field Artillery Regiment.

“I knew exactly what injury he had and immediately I knew what to do,” he said, referring to the gunshot victim. “It was essentially what I learned in [combat medic] school [at Fort Sam Houston] in San Antonio.”

Having formal military training as a combat medic has given Specialist (SPC) Sanchez an extra skill set that often sets him apart from his peers in the police department.

“We don’t usually see that kind of qualification and experience with a brand new deputy,” said sheriff’s department Sgt. Glen Carpenter, Deputy Sanchez’s shift supervisor, adding that most deputies do not have formal training as a medic or a first responder.

Pierce County Sheriff’s Deputy Sergio Sanchez also serves as a Specialist and a combat medic in the Washington Army National Guard.

Pierce County Sheriff’s Deputy Sergio Sanchez also serves as a Specialist and a combat medic in the Washington Army National Guard.

The drive-by shooting was not the only time SPC Sanchez has used his Army medic skills in his capacity as sheriff’s deputy. Several weeks after that incident, he was called to the scene of a hit-and-run where he found a man lying in the middle of the road.

“When we got closer we saw a large amount of blood coming from his head,” he said. “He was not responsive and barely breathing.”

SPC Sanchez said his training kicked in, and he stabilized the victim’s neck and spinal cord. He applied gauze and pressure to the head injury, and soon the injured man began to show signs of life.

“He eventually started moaning, so that was a good sign,” he said. “I just kept him stabilized until [the] fire [department] got there.”

SPC Sanchez was hit with the medic bug when he was a young boy and came across an old first aid bag from his father’s time in the Army.

“[I] was immediately drawn to what was inside, and spent hours studying the many different pieces of medical equipment,” he said.

However, even with his training, SPC Sanchez said he doesn’t think he, alone, saved these two people’s lives. As a combat medic he is trained to treat, stabilize and move patients on to higher care.

“I just treat and stabilize until fire personnel get there. They start doing [higher level] medical intervention.”

Being a combat medic allows SPC Sanchez to be a much more valuable commodity to the profession he loves so much.

“Being a deputy … I love it,” he said. “Not every day is the same. Being a medic adds a way for me to be helpful and effective to the citizens and my partners.”

So if you’re looking for a way to help your fellow citizens, consider joining the Army National Guard, which has a dual mission to serve the community and the Nation.

Service in this branch of the military is a part-time commitment, and this flexibility allows Soldiers to pursue civilian careers. You’ll receive training for a Guard career, too. Check out our job board to explore more than 150 options, in fields like engineering, aviation, military police, medicine, and armor and field artillery. And for personalized advice, contact your local recruiter, who can also walk you through the Guard’s benefits like money for college.

From an original story by Tech. Sgt. Erich B. Smith, National Guard Bureau, which originally appeared in the news section of NationalGuard.mil in May 2017.

Share on FacebookShare on Twitter

Spotlight on: Vigilant Guard 17 Training

MACON, Ga.– Soldiers from the South Carolina and Georgia Army National Guards came together to turn water samples from a murky lake into clear drinkable water during a training exercise last month.

The annual training event, Vigilant Guard 17, provides National Guard Soldiers an opportunity to create and improve relationships with different military and civilian agencies in case of an emergency. Part of the Guard’s mission is to respond to domestic emergencies like floods, hurricanes, and wildfires.

This year’s simulated scenario, a Category 3 hurricane, was relevant to the area considering the impact Hurricane Matthew had on the Southeastern United States in October 2016.

“We are reacting to a natural disaster that has affected this area, and we are working with the South Carolina National Guard to take water that isn’t clean and make it drinkable,” said SPC Shameka McCaskill, Alpha Co., 218th Brigade Support Battalion.

Training exercises like Vigilant Guard allow Soldiers to remain proficient in water purification. In a real-world situation, 92W Water Treatment Specialists are able to produce 1,500 gallons of potable water from fresh water and 1,200 gallons from salt water in an hour.

For more on what this type of exercise looks like, check out this video featuring Soldiers from the Georgia Army National Guard participating in a 2016 training exercise.

Some of the Soldiers participating in Vigilant Guard 17, including SPC McCaskill, have put their Guard skills to work in real-world situations, like during South Carolina’s historic flooding in 2015.

“We were activated for three weeks and during that time we traveled throughout the State, and brought clean drinking water to different communities,” she says. “What I do is important because we [Guard Soldiers] come fully prepared to provide something that everyone needs to live. Having clean water is critical during a natural disaster. 

Another Soldier able to put her water purification skills to work outside of the exercise is SGT Martika Burnett, Alpha Co., 348th BSB, Georgia National Guard. When not activated or training with her Unit, Burnett is a licensed Class 3 surface water treatment officer. Partnering during Vigilant Guard provides her the opportunity to see how other States operate.

“I take what I learn here, and use it at work, and vice versa,” said SGT Burnett. “I was able to use the skills I gained in the Guard and turn it into a career.”

Because service in the Guard is typically part-time, Soldiers are able to pursue civilian careers that build on their Guard training in one of 150 careers. For specific career information, check out our job board, which can be searched by location, keyword, or job category, such as logistics, engineering or infantry.

The Guard also offers money for college, allowing Soldiers to pursue degrees or vocational school. For more information on how you can join the Army National Guard, contact a recruiter today.

From an original story by SGT Tashera Pravato, 108th Public Affairs Detach, which originally appeared in the news section of NationalGuard.mil in March 2017

Share on FacebookShare on Twitter