Always Ready, Always There Reflects Guard’s Ability to Change with Times

An organization that is actually older than the country it serves could not have survived for nearly 380 years without being able to change with the times.

The Army National Guard, which will celebrate this milestone birthday on Dec. 13, continues to live up to its motto of “Always Ready, Always There” by adding new areas of focus and new career opportunities that reflect national trends. We at On Your Guard thought we’d take a look back at new initiatives and changes that got under way over the course of the past year.

Because cybersecurity is a top concern for anyone who uses technology, the Guard began focusing on standing up 10 Cyber Protection Teams in an effort to help the Nation better defend against cyber attacks. When we spoke with LTC Matt Chytka last fall, he anticipated Guard careers in technology and intelligence would continue to grow, just as they have in the private sector. 

National Guard Soldiers.LTC Chytka said the Guard was uniquely qualified to improve the country’s “cyber posture,” due to the fact that service is part-time, which allows a Citizen-Soldier® to attend school or work full- time in a private sector career.

“We have a very strong ability versus our active duty brethren to attract, and, particularly, to retain, highly skilled cyber military professionals that the Nation requires in order to maintain a keen cyber edge and superiority in the cyberspace realm,” he said.

While the Guard expands its career opportunities in STEM, it is also opening up more jobs to women.

The Guard, along with every other branch of the U.S. military, started seeing new faces in different roles last year as the Department of Defense (DoD) loosened restrictions regarding women serving in combat roles. Ultimately, the DoD announced in late 2015 that all military combat jobs, without exception, would be open to women who met the qualifications, like 2LT Tracci Dorgan-Bandy, who became the first female artillery officer in the South Carolina Army National Guard.

For her, a combat-oriented job was just one more area where she could prove herself and excel. Her previous Guard military occupational specialties (MOSs) included 25P Microwave Systems Operator/Maintainer and photojournalist.

“The Guard has opened so many doors for me, so many opportunities. I’ve never had anybody shut a door in my face in the Guard,” she said.

With more than 150 career fields to choose from, many of the Citizen-Soldiers we’ve interviewed say they appreciate the chance to move into career fields that might be completely different than their previous MOS, like SFC William Bart, who went into marketing and recruiting for the Alaska Guard after serving for years as 31B Military Police, which is one of the most searched for careers on our job board.

“You set your own destiny as far as your career goes,” SFC Bart said.

Of course, the best place to start thinking about your career destiny is to take a look at our job board, where you can search by keyword or location. You can also search by category, broadly defined as Administrative, Armor and Field Artillery, Aviation, Engineer, Infantry, Logistics Support, Mechanic and Maintenance, Medical, Military Police, Signal and Military Intelligence, and Transportation.

And for one-on-one advice, or answers to any questions you might have, contact a recruiter.

Share on FacebookShare on Twitter

November’s Hot Job is … 35P Cryptologic Linguist

Each month throughout 2015, On Your Guard is spotlighting a “hot job.” What defines these featured jobs as “hot”? One all-important benchmark: number of times people searched for it on the National Guard jobs board. So, here’s what’s hot for November.

Do you love foreign languages and have an analytical side too? If so, you might want to consider training to become a 35P Cryptologic Linguist in the Army National Guard.

This job plays a critical role in the Nation’s defense. You’ll use specialized signals equipment to eavesdrop on the enemy and exploit its communications to provide intelligence.

In this military occupational specialty (MOS), you’ll provide transcripts and translations, so good reading and writing skills are essential. The job goes beyond just translating what’s being said and that’s where analysis comes into play. You’ll need to understand context and intent to help provide mission support.

Watch this video about the 35P MOS to get a first-hand look at what cryptologic linguists do, and then read more about training and the benefits of serving in the National Guard.

The Guard will provide the training you need every step of the way to be successful in this MOS. After basic training, you’ll have anywhere from six to 52 weeks of advanced individual training (AIT), depending on the language. This on-the-job instruction in the field and the classroom takes place at Goodfellow Air Force Base in Texas.

Those who aren’t fluent in a foreign language will need to attend training at the Defense Language Institute in Monterey, Calif., for six to 18 months before they can attend AIT.

This MOS can translate to a civilian career as a translator or linguist for Government agencies, embassies, universities and companies that conduct business overseas.

By serving part-time in the National Guard, you’ll be eligible for benefits like money for college and health and life insurance.

If you think you have what it takes to provide critical information in defense of the country, visit our jobs board and contact a recruiter today.

 

Share on FacebookShare on Twitter

STEM in the Guard: A Focus on Technology

STEM_technologyThis summer, during the first week of every month, we’re taking a closer look at Army National Guard careers in each of the four STEM disciplines: science, technology, engineering, and math. Why? Because these jobs are in demand, both in the Guard and in the civilian workforce. Candidates with expertise in these fields are needed right now and well into the foreseeable future. In fact, the U.S. Department of Commerce predicts that STEM opportunities will increase by 17 percent over the next three years.

So, without further ado, on to Part 2 … technology.

Maybe you always know what new gadget is on the horizon, long before its release date. Or maybe you understand how everything works, whether it’s the latest smartphone OS release, the motherboard in your desktop hard drive, or the computer system in your car.

If so, a technology career may be a smart choice for your future. Starting down that career path by pursuing a technology military occupational specialty (MOS) in the Guard is also a smart choice, for three important reasons:

  • The skills you learn in the Guard will give you a head start on qualifying for civilian jobs like computer science, database administrator, network engineer, systems analyst, IT consultant, and software developer.
  • As with most Guard careers, your service is part-time, so you can earn a degree and/or work in that civilian technology job at the same time.
  • Finally, the Guard offers money for college and other great benefits like affordable healthcare.

The National Guard’s technology forces support global communications and intelligence efforts. Together, they design, build, manage, and maintain telecommunications systems and information systems. Many also gather and analyze highly sensitive data.

The following are some of the Guard’s technology military occupational specialties. Click the links to view nationwide job openings and read a more detailed description for each MOS.

25B Information Technology Specialist – Construct, edit, and test computer system programs. Install and perform maintenance on information processing systems, peripheral equipment, and other associated devices in both mobile and fixed facilities.

25L Cable Systems Installer-Maintainer – Install, operate, and perform maintenance on cable and wire communications systems, devices, and associated equipment.

25Q Multichannel Transmission Systems Operator-Maintainer – Direct and perform maintenance on communications systems, communications security devices, and associated equipment. Install and operate power generators.

25S Satellite Communication Systems Operator-Maintainer – Supervise, install, operate, and maintain strategic and tactical multichannel satellite communications ground terminals, systems, network, communication security (COMSEC) devices, and associated equipment.

29E Electronic Warfare Specialist – Perform and supervise action involving the use of electromagnetic energy.

35N Signals Intelligence Analyst – Supervise, analyze, and report intercepted foreign communications at all echelons. Assist in synchronizing intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance. Produce combat, strategic, and tactical intelligence reports.

94M Radar Repairer – Perform and supervise maintenance on ground-based sensor and radar electronic assemblies and associated equipment.

If you aren’t sure which of these career paths is best for you, don’t worry. One way to narrow it all down is to take the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) test. All Guard applicants take the ASVAB to help align their strengths with the military occupational specialties that best capitalize on those skills.

To learn more about STEM careers in the National Guard, check out our STEM Career Guide, visit our jobs board, and contact a recruiter today.

Share on FacebookShare on Twitter